Bilbao / Getxo, Spain
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Bilbao / Getxo, Spain | 2017 Spring

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You must enroll in at least 12 and up to 18 credits. While you may enroll in up to 18 credits, we recommend you enroll in 12-15 credits in order to have time to fully experience the local area's culture and people. Course availability may be subject to change for reasons beyond our control, such as student interest.

Spanish Language and Literature Studies

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks as well as elective language and literature courses. The track courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester, with final examinations and grades awarded after each course. In Bilbao/Getxo, most tracks are composed of three courses. You are not obligated to take all three courses. You may take only the first two courses of a track or the first course alone. In this way, you can accommodate your language study to allow for greater flexibility with business or elective courses. If you have already taken the first course in the track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you do have to audit it. In that way, you reinforce your knowledge of Spanish and become familiar with the professor and the class. Language course sections are small, with an average size of nine students each. In addition to your language courses you may enroll in language and literature electives and/or courses from International Business and Cultural Studies for a total of 12-18 credits.

Track I (11 credits)—Prerequisite: none

Track II (9 credits)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish

Track III (9 credits)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish

Track IV (6 credits)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish

Language and Literature Electives

Taught in Spanish

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

International Business and Cultural Studies

Taught in English or Spanish
The following courses are designed to familiarize you with the region and provide a multi-disciplinary approach to your studies. Courses are taught in English unless noted in Spanish; courses taught in Spanish are for students in Track III or above unless otherwise indicated.

Fall Semester

  • Internship (up to 3 credits, taught in Spanish) This course has a refundable fee.

International Business Studies

Cultural Studies

Spring Semester

  • Internship (up to 3 credits, taught in Spanish) This course has a refundable fee.

International Business Studies

Cultural Studies

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.unr.edu

Field Studies

USAC helps you explore the historical, cultural, and natural features of the region with carefully planned tours. If taken for credit, added academic requirements (readings, research, written assignments, reports, etc) deepen your experience. This turns a tour into a Field Study which counts as part of your credit load. The optional Madrid Tour can be taken as a Field Study course; you will be expected to keep a journal and answer a series of questions about the sites visited. Upon arrival in Bilbao/Getxo, you will have follow-up meetings with a professor and be expected to take a final exam. The written work may be completed in Spanish or in English.

Internships

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development particularly in your study abroad setting. USAC internships are considered courses and count as part of your credit load. They can be time-consuming, but are very worthwhile. Students are placed in an environment with high exposure to culture and language. The student working in a Spanish-speaking environment must be able to communicate at an advanced language level (track IV or proficiency in Spanish). There are technical terms that the student will acquire on the job. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses.

Internship opportunities fall into broad categories; possible internship placements include; non-profits, consulting firms, marketing firms, museums, software companies, marketing and consultancy agencies. Previous students have been placed at the Guggenheim Museum, NGOs such as UNICEF, Oxfam and Caritas, PMP Management Factory, Alden Marketing, Anboto Group, Sarein Sistemas, and more. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC; rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview with the internship sponsor on site.

Eligibility—enrollment in Track IV or fluency in Spanish (for Spanish-speaking placements), enrollment in the Bilbao program, a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, and junior standing at the time of the internship. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

Host University Courses

Taught in English or Spanish
Enrich your studies by taking advantage of the chance to attend courses at your host university. Opportunities vary. In some cases you will be able to enroll directly as a student and earn transferable credit, in other cases you may earn a letter or certificate of completion along with a grade which may or may not be accepted for credit by your school. Work with your home academic advisor to determine whether such courses will be accepted for credit. Even when they don't, look at the opportunity as a learning bonus. Courses taken at the host university are taken in addition to your USAC classes and do not replace USAC credits. Work with your Resident Director to determine your options and to avoid conflicts with your USAC class schedule.

The Universidad del Pa ís Vasco offers direct enrollment courses for USAC students. These direct enrollment opportunities are a great way to immerse yourself in the local university and make friends outside of your USAC courses. You may enroll in courses offered by the UPV alongside local Spanish students and international Erasmus students. All classes offered at the UPV are open to USAC students at no extra fee. The main academic fields students typically choose from are: management, marketing, finance, economics, and political science. The course offerings taught in English are very bright; courses taught in Spanish are only available for students with high language proficiency.

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professors are also teaching as Visiting Professors.

Spring Semester:

Dr. Melvin Jameson | University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Courses offered:

Dr. Jameson (PhD, UC Berkeley) has taught finance and international business at UNLV for 26 years. Having spent a year abroad as an undergraduate, he strives to encourage international awareness through examples and applications in his teaching and by encouraging practical international experience.

Course Descriptions

Advanced Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

This advanced level course of Spanish has been designed for students who have completed three years of Spanish and although they may manage in completing daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course offers the students the opportunity to enhance their vocabulary in specific and technical areas, and to improve their grammatical accuracy in oral and written production.

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Advanced Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

Advanced Spanish II (SPN 411) has been designed for students who have completed more than three years of Spanish and although they may manage in daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course will offer them the opportunity to enhance the coherence and cohesion of their production, and to improve their grammatical accuracy.

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Advanced Spanish Writing and Stylistics

Spring (Spanish; 400-level; 3 credits)

Advanced Spanish Writing and Stylistics is an elective course for students of Spanish as a second language at an advanced level, who have probably taken at least three years of college Spanish. The goal of this course is to enhace the writing abilities, taking the written text as a contextualized communication event, addressed to an audience and with a clear and defined purpose. Therefore, class activities are centered around the analysis and the understading of different written genres, so that they can be produced latter. In addition, this course does not neglect the oral interaction and expression, since the class is conducted entirely in Spanish, reinforcing collaboration through group work.

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Basque and Iberian Cultures

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

The main aim of this course is to introduce the students to the culture of Basque people. Emphasis will be placed on discussion of the Basque culture in relation to other cultures of the Iberian Peninsula and attempt will be made to show the singularity of the Basque country and the Basque people.

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Basque Cuisine

Fall (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

This course is designed to teach Basque and other popular regional recipes, as well as tips, serving ideas, and a bit of etiquette and customs. The lessons are arranged by meal, so that one can easily translate the lessons to real life cooking situations.

In addition to learning how to make appealing appetizers and entrees, students take several classes in baking and pastries. They learn tricks and tips that can be used in daily life. Students will spend time chopping onions, peeling potatoes, cutting meat, kneading dough and beating eggs, all of it under the supervision of the cooks who can teach them the tricks of the trade and correct any mistakes.

Generally, classes include one to two hours of explanations along with a practical hands-on component in the school (fully equipped and stocked kitchens where students cook).

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Business Spanish

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

The objective of this course is to enable students to develop competence in an area which normally does not constitute a part of language learning. You will become familiar with the terminology and syntax of the world of economics, business administration, markets and related topics, in order to enable you to communicate correctly in the target language. Business writing, correspondence, oral and written translation of business related material is also practiced. Prerequisite: six semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish - Prerequisite of 4 semesters of college Spanish.

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Consumer Behavior

Spring (Marketing; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course discusses the nature and determinants of consumer attributes, consumption, and purchasing. Students will focus on the influence of socio-psychological factors such as personality, small groups, demographic variables, social class and culture. Prerequisite: lower level Business core. Taught in English. (Spring semester)

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Contemporary Spain through Spanish Cinema

Spring (Art, History; 400-level; 3 credits)

Contemporary Spain through Spanish Cinema will explore social, political, and economical changes encountered in Spain in the course of the last fifty years through the study of twelve representative films. Readings, screenings, and analysis will center on selected works of Buñuel, Bardem, Saura, Almodóvar, and others. Students will read, discuss, and write papers about the selected films applying presented principles of film theory. Taught in Spanish - Prerequisite of 4 semesters of college level Spanish.

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Conversational Spanish for Business Interactions

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 1 credit)

This course is designed to develop the required oral skills for commercial transactions and activities in a context of Spanish for business purposes. In particular, three oral communicative activities will be addressed: The job interview, the business negotiation/argumentation and advising in commercial activities. In all three of these three activities, the command of the linguistic and nonverbal communication will be emphasized in order to form leaders in the business environment.

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Corporate Finance

Fall (Finance; 300-level; 3 credits)

Besides corporate decision making from the CFO’s perspective regarding their firm’s financing arrangements—the debt/equity mix, e.g., bonds, loans or stock—as well, we will evaluate what the retail landscape has to offer the individual investor thinking of their own retirement and personal portfolio decisions/weights. Business/Financial management topics include the importance of cash flow—especially DCF, the Time Value of Money, Net Present Value and the volatility of returns given past—and recent—market history. Currency (Exchange Rate Risk)—the FX market—will also be considered. Aspects of Business Ethics will be timely and frequent.

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Economic and Political Institutions of the European Union

Fall (Economics, History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

From the Middle Ages on, many thinkers proposed the union of Europe. But only after the Second World War the material conditions existed for making it possible. This course shows why and how this attempt has been so successful. Taught in English. (Fall semester)

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Economic Development and Non-Governmental Organizations

Spring (Economics, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) are playing an increasingly important role in global politics, economic development and social change. This course critically discusses the basic dimensions for the understanding of the growing relevance of NGOs in human and sustainable development and global governance. NGOs are formed to provide services or advocate for issues that are perceived as overlooked or ineffectively addressed by national and local governments, the private sector, or multilateral institutions. They represent a civil society response to the identification of diverse problems, a venue for the development of innovative policy making, and a means of identifying deficient policies, ineffective programs or gaps in service delivery. NGOs play a crucial role in critiquing, facilitating, and supplementing the public and private sector. After some conceptual clarifications regarding the changing meanings of development, and through the analysis of NGOs´ structures from an international perspective, the course will address the legal, economic, managerial, and policy planning process aspects of non-profit NGOs. The course explores the full range of NGO strategies, including mobilizing and organizing communities, developing and operating development programs and services, engaging in institutional policy making and creating advocacy networks both at local and global scale.

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Elementary Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Spanish I (SPN 111) is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have not taken any Spanish courses at college-level before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence by providing the opportunities to develop the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

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Elementary Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 100-level; 4 credits)

Elementary Spanish II is a four-credit language course offered to students who are enrolled in USAC and have taken one course of Spanish at college-level or its equivalent before. This course is designed to help non-native speakers of Spanish to acquire basic communicative competence. It provides opportunities for the development of the basic skills of a language: listening, speaking, interacting, reading and writing. The main emphasis of this course is on communication and, therefore, class attendance is essential.

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Global Economics

Fall (Economics; 300-level; 3 credits)

This class provides a nice introduction to some of the debates—economic, but eventually political—about Globalization. The global monetary system and the debate swirling around international trade theory—NTT and STT—will be covered, but alas, not resolved. How companies can use this knowledge to enter global markets is discussed in the interim. Regional Economic Areas will be covered, including, the EU, NAFTA, UNISUR, APEC, etc. Finally, the theories and debates about international trade are reviewed again, but this time from the foreign direct investment (FDI) perspective—indeed, isn’t money just another product to be traded?

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Intermediate Spanish I

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intermediate Spanish I (SPN 211) is a three-credit course offered to students who have completed a year of college Spanish or its equivalent. In this course, the students will learn to narrate in the main time-frames, as well as to recognize the different uses of the subjunctive mood in the expression of different degrees of certainty, the expression of wishes and advice.

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Intermediate Spanish II

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intermediate II is a course designed for students who have completed a year and a half of college Spanish or its equivalent and want to learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

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International Business

Spring (International Business, Management; 400-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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International Financial Management

Spring (Finance, International Business; 400-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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International Marketing

Spring (International Business, Marketing; 400-level; 3 credits)

A study of all aspects of marketing unique to international business. This course examines the impact of cultures, ethics, history, politics, and the law on marketing practice in the globalized economy. It also provides knowledge of tools for cultural analysis and discusses issues related to culture, the economy, and all other environmental variables that affect global business. A better understanding of cultural diversity is essential for successful international business, and this course provides a comprehensive perspective. Prerequisite: lower level Business core. Taught in English. (Spring semester)

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International Strategic Management

Fall (Management; 400-level; 3 credits)

International strategic management addresses the questions of how and why some companies are able to develop and maintain competitive advantage in a global environment. Why do some companies in a given industry do better than others? We will examine how the international environment influences the choices that senior-level executives make regarding which products and services to offer, how and where to get them built and delivered, and how to organize and finance their company. We will learn that effective competitive intelligence at the level of the company, industry, and broader environment drives decisions that lead to competitive advantage.

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Madrid Field Study

Fall (Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)

This field study course is designed to optimize the benefits of the Madrid tour by providing a solid historic and artistic base for studies of Spanish language and culture. The point of departure for the course will be the sites visited on the four-day tour of Madrid and surroundings. Requirements include pre-departure readings, a daily journal of the tour, completion of a comprehensive study guide and a final exam which will be given at the program site. The tour will be given in English. The written work may be done in English or Spanish and it must be handed in before the final exam. This course has an additional fee of $750 to help pay for transportation, entrance fees, guides, lodging and some meals.

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Management and Leadership

Fall (Business, Management; 400-level; 3 credits)

Theory and principles of Management and Leadership. This includes the roles & responsibilities of a manager as well as different ways to lead and motivate people. Research and discussion of ethics in leadership will also be explored. This is a seminar-based course examining management and leadership theory and research, emphasizing the development of personal and interpersonal skills doing team working with videos, books and presentations that should be shared and discussed throughout the whole period. There are no prerequisites listed for this course.

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Marketing Principles

Fall (Marketing; 200-level; 3 credits)

A complete introductory course on Marketing. Emphasis will be put on how interdisciplinary Marketing really is—borrowing from Cultural Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, and more!—all in the name of “strategies” (blending the Marketing Mix 4-P’s) to create and communicate value. The possibility for firms to identify their source of Competitive Advantage will be discussed as well as which value proposition to offer and techniques for competitive analysis.

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Operations Management

Spring (Management; 300-level; 3 credits)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the concepts and techniques of operations management across all activities of an organization and for all types of processes. Basic methods of analysis to support decision-making will be presented.

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Seminar in Developing Effective Teaching Skills

Fall (General Education, Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (General Education, Spanish; 200-level; 1 credit)

This course has been designed to meet the specific needs of the USAC students when first teaching ESL in a Spanish classroom. Taking into account that it is the first time teaching for most of the students, s/he will be provided with the background of what to expect and how to deal with such a challenge. The package will not only have the assigned readings for each class session but is also meant to be a useful resource providing the necessary teaching tools for student teachers. After reading these articles students will design two oral tasks and present them to the class, pretending it is a real language class. This is a very intensive course and will only last for a couple of weeks therefore full engagement is required from students as well as being prompt and serious when meeting all the deadlines for the different tasks assigned.

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Spanish Composition I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

This is a third year couse for students who have completed two years of Spanish at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a short novel will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

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Spanish Composition II

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Spanish Composition II (SPN 306) is a third year course of three credtis for students who have completed two years and a half of Spanish at the University level or their equivalent. The focus of the course is on improving the learners´ writing abilities with the analysis and the production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics will be reviewed in order to enhance and increase learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a novel or a collection of short stories will strengthen the formal instruction.

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Spanish Conversation and Oral Skills I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 2 credits)
Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 2 credits)

The objective of this course is to facilitate the acquisition of language necessary to express oneself in daily situations as well as in more difficult contexts. Different conversational themes and related vocabulary are introduced for discussion. Prerequisite: two semesters of college Spanish.

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Spanish Culture and Civilization

Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

In this general civilization course, the customs and lifestyles of the Spanish will be studied, both in their historical perspectives as well as in the present. There is also a general discussion of the most important geographic, historical, social, economic, and artistic aspects of Spain, as well as of the most outstanding individuals in each area. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish. (Spring semester)

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Surfing

Fall (Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)

This class is co-produced by USAC and “Quicksilver Surf Eskola”. It is a 1 credit PASS/FAIL course in physical education. The class will meet for 2 hours for each of 10 sessions. (20 contact hours) Quicksilver Surf Eskola will provide the needed equipment and insurance, as well as showers and a locker room. The order of the activities on the syllabus may be subject to changes for reasons beyond our control, such as inclement weather, very big waves, etc.

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Survey of Art I: European/Western Art

Fall (Art; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course studies the history of Western European Art from Prehistoric times to the Renaissance. The course has a general introduction and six main topics: Prehistoric Art, Egyptian and Western Asian Art, Classical, Roman Art, Gothic Art and arts evolution at the time of the Renaissance. Prerequisite of 4 semesters of college Spanish.

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Survey of Art II: European/Western Art

Spring (Art; 200-level; 3 credits)

Art history of western Europe from the 17th century to the present, with particular emphasis on country specific art. For example, students in Spain will study influential Spanish artists along with important European artists of that period. The art and vision of the world of each period are studied through architecture, sculpture and painting, including: Baroque (Bernini, Velazquez, Rembrandt), Neoclassicism, Goya, the 19th century (Impressionism, new architecture), and the 20th century (Picasso, Dalí, abstract artists). The objectives of the course are to develop a more complete knowledge of European and local culture through art and to learn to identify, analyze and appreciate works of art. Taught in Spanish - Prerequisite of 4 semesters of college Spanish.

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Survey of Spanish Literature I

Fall (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

Se trata de un exhaustivo recorrido por los principales hitos de la Literatura Española –autores y obras- de la Edad Media y Siglos de Oro (Renacimiento y Barroco). Se aportará conocimientos teóricos para entender los sucesivos momentos y poder comentar en profundidad los textos correspondientes.

This is an exhaustive review of the major milestones in Spanish Literature including authors and works from the Middle and Golden Age (Renaissance and Baroque). It will provide students with the theoretical knowledge that will enable them to understand the successive moments and to be able to comment in depth the relevant literary texts.

Taught in Spanish - Prerequisite of 4 semesters of college level Spanish.

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Survey of Spanish Literature II

Spring (Spanish; 300-level; 3 credits)

A study of the development of Spanish literature through the analysis of literary movements and the comparison of the most important authors of each period from the 18th up to the 20th century. Texts from different literary genres are selected which demonstrate underlying ideas, the idiosyncrasies of the Spanish people, and universal values, as well as the literary characteristics of the works themselves. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Spanish. Taught in Spanish. (Spring Semester)

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The Unique Basque Culture and Language: 7 Field Trips for a Practical Experience

Spring (Anthropology, Basque; 200-level; 3 credits)

The 7 fieldtrips that the student will enjoy by enrolling this course will include History, Mythology, Politics, Art and Gastronomy. The aim of this course is to challenge commonly held views and stereotypes about the Basque people. All of this will offer an extended vision of the diversity and complexity of the Basque country.

Throughout the history of the Basque people, the Language, Euskara, has been and still is the feature which best describes the Basque nation. For this reason an approach to the Basque language will also be provided to allow students to fully comprehend the Culture of Basque. Since every fieldtrip will include a student´s oral presentation on a topic related to the visit,

There will only be assignments and tasks that will allow the professors to assess the student´s learning.

Considering that the course is based on visits, every missed fieldtrip will automatically bring down your grade 10%.

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Quick Details

2017-18 App. Cycle

Spring: Open

2018-19 App. Cycle

Application opens 9/1:

Summer I (5 weeks)

Summer II (3 weeks)

Summer I & II (8 weeks)

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

U.S. Credit

Program Capacity

65 students

Instruction

English | Spanish

Member

APUNE--Associación de Programas Universitarios Norteamericanos en España