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Course Information

Viterbo, Italy | 2014 Spring

You may enroll in 12-18 credits. This list of courses is subject to minor changes; course availability is subject to student interest and enrollment. Please visit the USAC website for complete course descriptions. Prerequisites for all courses will be verified during course registration. Students not taking a language track are required to take at least one course of Italian.

Italian Language Studies

  • Elementary Italian I (FLL, 100-level, 4 credits, required for non-language track students)
  • Italian Conversation (FLL, 300-level, 2 credits, recommended for Track II, III, IV)

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks as well as elective language and literature courses. The track courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in the track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it. Language course sections are kept to a maximum enrollment of 15 students each. All students are required to enroll in the courses listed for the appropriate language track plus elective courses for a total of 12-18 credits. If you are not taking an intensive language track, you are required to take the first course of Italian I appropriate to your level (Elementary I, Intermediate I, Composition I, or Advanced I).

Track I (8 credits)—Prerequisite: none

  • Elementary Italian I (FLL, 100-level, 4 credits)
  • Elementary Italian II (FLL, 100-level, 4 credits)

Track II (6 credits)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college Italian

  • Intermediate Italian I (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Intermediate Italian II (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)

Track III (6 credits)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college Italian

  • Italian Composition I (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Composition II (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits)

Track IV (6 credits)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college Italian

  • Advanced Italian I (FLL, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Advanced Italian II (FLL, 400-level, 3 credits)

History, Art, Environmental and Italian Studies

Taught in English

The following courses are designed to familiarize you with the region and to provide a multi-disciplinary approach to your studies. If you are not taking an intensive language track, you are required to at least one course of Italian (Elementary I, Intermediate I, Composition I, or Advanced I).

Fall Semester

  • Internship (up to 3 credits)

Art and Environmental Studies

  • Environmental Science and Policy (ENV/PSC, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Heart of Italy Field Study (FLL, 200-level, 1 credit) This course has an additional fee.
  • Italian Art: Etruscan and Roman Art (ART, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Art: Italy in the Middle Ages (ART, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Hill Towns: History through Urban Form (ARCH/ART/HIST, 300-level, 3 credits) This course has an additional fee for field trips.
  • Studio Art I: Beginning Drawing and Painting Italy (ART, 100-level, 3 credits)
  • Studio Art I: Advanced Drawing and Painting Italy (ART, 300-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: two years of college-level drawing and/or painting.

History and Italian Studies

  • Contemporary Italian Cinema (FLL/ART/FILM, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Gender and Communication (WS/COM/SOC, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Government and Politics in Italy and Europe (PSC, 400/600-level, 3 credits)
  • Intercultural Communication (COM, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Cuisine and the Mediterranean Diet (NUTR, 400-level, 1 credit) This course has an additional fee for materials.
  • Italian Cuisine and the Mediterranean Diet (NUTR, 400-level, 3 credits) This course has an additional fee for materials.
  • Italian Culture (ANTH/FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Culture (ANTH/FLL, 300-level, 3 credits, taught in Italian)
  • Italian History: Italy in the Medieval Era (HIST, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Roman Civilization (HIST, 300-level, 3 credits)

Spring Semester

  • Internship (up to 3 credits)

Art and Environmental Studies

  • Investigation through Art in Italy (ART, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Art: Baroque and the 1800s (ART, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Art: Italy in the Renaissance (ART, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Gardens and Mediterranean Landscape Design (ARCH/ART, 300-level, 3-5 credits) This course has an additional fee for field trips.
  • Mediterranean Landscape and Environment (GEOG/NRES, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Southern Italy Field Study (FLL, 200-level, 1 credit) This course has an additional fee.
  • Studio Art I and II: Beginning Drawing and Painting Italy (ART, 100-level, 3 credits)
  • Studio Art I and II: Advanced Drawing and Painting Italy (ART, 300-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: two years of college-level drawing and/or painting.
  • Sustainable Landscape Design (NRES/ENV, 300-level, 3 credits)

History and Italian Studies

  • Gender, Media, and Literature (WS/COM/JOUR/ENGL, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Cuisine and the Mediterranean Diet (NUTR, 400-level, 1 credit) This course has an additional fee for materials.
  • Italian Cuisine and the Mediterranean Diet (NUTR, 400-level, 3 credits) This course has an additional fee for materials.
  • Italian Culture (ANTH/FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Italian Culture (ANTH/FLL, 300-level, 3 credits, taught in Italian)
  • Italian Literature in English Translation (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Modern Italian History (HIST, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Society and Culture in Renaissance Italy (HIST/FLL, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Travel Writing (ENGL/JOUR, 400/600-level, 3 credits)

Direct Enrollment at Tuscia University

Taught in Italian

Tuscia University offers direct enrollment courses for USAC students. These direct enrollment opportunities are a great way to immerse yourself in the local university and make friends outside of your USAC courses. Keep in mind that these courses need to be taken in addition to your full time USAC course load and transfer of credit is not guaranteed. Your Resident Director must approve and will help you to compile a course schedule that will accommodate both USAC and Tuscia University's calendars.

3-Credit Courses

Intermediate and Advanced Italian students may directly enroll in one course offered by Tuscia University in the fields of Italian Literature, English Literature (partially taught in English), English/Italian Translation, History (Byzantine, Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Modern, Contemporary), Music History, Economics, Marketing, Political Science, Sociology, Tourism, Environmental Studies, Forestry, or Biology.

Italian universities follow a different calendar, with final exams in January (fall semester) and June (spring semester). It is possible to organize early exams (December and May) on an individual basis, but USAC cannot guarantee this. Italian faculty often help foreign students by assigning specific reading in English or may allow to turn in papers written in English. Some exams may have an oral section and some faculty allow for it to be conducted in English as well.

1-2 Credit Workshops

USAC students, including those with less advanced Italian, can enroll in workshops offered by Tuscia University in Viterbo such as "Ceramic Restoration" or "Archeology Excavations."

Course Descriptions

Advanced Italian I

Spring (Italian, 3 credits, 400-level)

Presented through the use of theoretical and practical materials that permit the student to consolidate some of those grammatical aspects of the Italian language that, because of their difficulty, require frequent review and further development. A comprehensive revision of the grammatical points that present the most trouble in Italian. Care will be taken on understanding and practicing the use of all grammatical forms in both the written and spoken Italian.

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Advanced Italian II

Spring (Italian, 3 credits, 400-level)

Presented through the use of theoretical and practical materials that permit the student to consolidate some of those grammatical aspects of the Italian language that, because of their difficulty, require frequent review and further development. A comprehensive revision of the grammatical points that present the most trouble in Italian. Care will be taken on understanding and practicing the use of all grammatical forms in both the written and spoken Italian.

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Contemporary Italian Cinema

Fall (Art, Film, Italian, 3 credits, 200-level)

The Italian film course serves as a key to understanding Italian society. It introduces contemporary Italian film and its major genres, studies film in relation to performing arts, culture, politics, and society and examines Italian film production from the Eighties to the present. Taught in English. (Fall semester)

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Elementary Italian I

Fall (Italian, 4 credits, 100-level)
Spring (Italian, 4 credits, 100-level)

Introduction to the Italian language through the development of language skills and structural analysis. Includes an introduction to Italian culture.

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Elementary Italian II

Fall (Italian, 4 credits, 100-level)
Spring (Italian, 4 credits, 100-level)

Introduction to the Italian language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. Includes an introduction to Italian culture.

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Environmental Science and Policy

Fall (Environmental Science, 3 credits, 300-level)

The course will examine issues related to management, monitoring and description of ecosystems and the services they provide to human communities. Some among the most serious and urgent environmental issues (e.g. conservation and management of natural resources; pollution; biodiversity; global change) will be discussed from a theoretical and practical point of view, through the analysis of real case studies. A brief overview on the Mediterranean landscape and related environmental issues will be included in the course. National and international policies developed at a global scale to face environmental issues, with special attention to European Union and United States will be analyzed.

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Gender and Communication

Fall (Sociology, Speech Communications, Women's Studies / Gender Studies, 3 credits, 200-level)

Mass media has become more and more powerful in shaping the world’s perception of itself. Racial, gender, and class-based stereotypes are perpetuated in visual culture but rarely questioned. This course will examine the constructed nature of gender roles in culture, and the way categories such as “masculine” and “feminine” have come to seem natural and unchanging.

We will be considering authorship-audience interaction in the production of messages in communicative practices, and the way gender, race and class affect the production of media. Throughout the course these key concepts will be interrogated and finally understood as flexible and as created and disseminated through media communication.

Students will be encouraged to become critical receivers of communicative messages.

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Gender, Media, and Literature

Spring (English, Journalism, Women's Studies / Gender Studies, 3 credits, 300-level)

Poststructuralist perspectives have brought about a major shift in ways of thinking about culture at large. They have demonstrated that the production and consumption of communication can no longer be considered a neutral activity and have helped to understand the dominant representational modes at work in our society.

Once thought timeless and universal, the idea of a Western canon is now undermined by the combined forces of feminism, multiculturalism, popular culture and relativistic literary theories. Through reading and discussion this course will examine some of the ways in which the creation of ideas is accomplished through communicative practices.

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Government and Politics in Italy and Europe

Fall (Political Science, 3 credits, 400/600-level)

This course will give students an overview of the Italian political system and of the country’s social structures and political culture, addressing a number of themes, paradoxes and problems inherent to Italian politics. The course will focus mainly on the most recent developments in Italian politics, particularly those of the last twenty years. However, a longer historical perspective, covering the post-war period, will also be supplied, providing the students with the tools for understanding the present situation.

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Heart of Italy Field Study

Fall (Italian, 1 credit, 200-level)

This field study course is designed to optimize the benefits of the tour by providing a solid historic and artistic base for studies of Italian culture, art and architecture. The point of departure for the course will be the sites visited on the five-day tour: Tuscany, Florence, Pisa, Lucca, and Siena.

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Intercultural Communication

Fall (Speech Communications, 3 credits, 400-level)

Globalization is a much talked about phenomenon which brings with it inevitable exchanges between cultures. How these exchanges are communicated and perceived largely depends on the person’s degree of cultural intelligence. A knowledge of foreign language(s) is only a part of that cultural intelligence.

Given the multicultural structure of the class, students will be able to immediately utilize the tools and reference points conveyed during the course in order to explore and verify other national cultures’ traits and characteristics.

Over the duration of this course students will be exposed to group project work, presentation skills to a multicultural audience, personal awareness and new situations which will test and improve their communications competency.

The success and enjoyment of the course will be based on the level of cultural exchange and learning which occurs both within the classroom and outside of it. In order to develop this learning experience, techniques such as coaching and storytelling may be utilized for the purpose of heightening the student’s level of awareness of their experiences, perceptions and behaviors and how these may be modified, allowing the student to better adapt to his / her new environment.

A new found self confidence can be achieved by knowing how to successfully deal with situations of conflict and by understanding how to influence others for the purpose of meeting one’s own personal and professional objectives in life.

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Intermediate Italian I

Fall (Italian, 3 credits, 200-level)
Spring (Italian, 3 credits, 200-level)

Intended to further develop Italian language skills, both oral and written. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Particular emphasis on oral skills.

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Intermediate Italian II

Fall (Italian, 3 credits, 200-level)
Spring (Italian, 3 credits, 200-level)

Intended to further develop Italian language skills, both oral and written. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Particular emphasis on oral skills.

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Investigation through Art in Italy

Spring (Art, 3 credits, 300-level)

This course considers the readability of Italian visual and material culture. Through reading, lecture, guided discussion, and direct engagement with art works, student will expand their understanding of historical and contemporary practices in art. We will examine and the ideas that gave rise to the examples considered. The central concern of this course will be to understand the ways in which meaning can be communicated in art. Students will expand their capacity to read and interpret works of art, deepening their understanding of visual culture.

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Italian Art: Baroque and the 1800's

Spring (Art, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course will examine the development of Italian and European art and architecture from the early 17th Century to the middle 19th Century, focusing on the major artists and architects in the Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism and Romanticism. Baroque Italy produced some of the greatest artists in world history including Caravaggio, Pietro da Cortona, Borromini and Bernini. Students will study the art work in its physical space and cultural context. Visits in and around Viterbo as well as in Rome will give students the opportunity to experience first-hand what is covered in class.

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Italian Art: Etruscan and Roman Art

Fall (Art, 3 credits, 400-level)

The course offers an overview of the Italian Art through the Etruscan and Roman culture from the early Iron Age (c. 1000 BC) to the Late Antiquity (c. 400 AD). Lectures are thematically organized as well as chronologically progressive. The program also provides firsthand knowledge of the art and architecture through on-site visits to archaeological sites, monuments and museums in Etruria and Rome.

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Italian Art: Italy in the Middle Ages

Fall (Art, 3 credits, 300-level)

The course will describe and analyze Etruscan and Roman Art, Romanesque and Gothic through painting, sculpture and architecture.

The subject matter of the lectures will be illustrated through tangible, on-the-spot examples in Viterbo and surroundings and completed with visits to museums, architectural walks and videos.

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Italian Art: Italy in the Renaissance

Spring (Art, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course will examine the development of Italian art and architecture from the later 14 th Century to 16th Century, focusing on the major artists and architects in the Renaissance and Mannerism in central Italy. Renaissance Italy produced some of the greatest artists in world history including Donatello, Piero Della Francesca, Leonardo, Raphael and Michelangelo. Students will study the art work in its physical space and cultural context. Visits in and around Viterbo as well as in Rome will give students the opportunity to experience first-hand what is covered in class.

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Italian Composition I

Fall (Italian, 3 credits, 300-level)
Spring (Italian, 3 credits, 300-level)

Description not available at this time

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Italian Composition II

Fall (Italian, 3 credits, 300-level)
Spring (Italian, 3 credits, 300-level)

Description not available at this time

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Italian Conversation

Fall (Italian, 2 credits, 300-level)
Spring (Italian, 2 credits, 300-level)

Description not available at this time

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Italian Cuisine and the Mediterranean Diet

Fall (Anthropology, Nutrition, 1/3 credits, 300-level)
Spring (Anthropology, Nutrition, 1/3 credits, 300-level)
Spring (Anthropology, Nutrition, 1/3 credits, 300-level)

We’ll start with a general introduction to Italy and Italian food and wine with an emphasis on regionality. We’ll proceed to contemporary issues, such as the Mediterranean diet, public health, food production and distribution, and Italy’s role in the global food economy. Specific food products, both artisanal and mass-produced, will be tasted and discussed. We’ll visit wineries, food producers, factories, farms, and other places of interest for foodies and nutritionists. We’ll travel within Tuscany and to other regions, namely Latium (Rome) and Emilia Romagna (Bologna and Parma), to see first hand how regional the food culture can be. The goal is to use Italy as a case study, in order to both experience a separate and distinct food and nutrition culture, and to provide a window of understanding into our own. The course includes a cooking workshop where students will put in practice the theory acquired by preparing different dishes, using and combining different ingredients in order to comply with specific dietary needs and/or restrictions, learning more about regional differences and tasting freshly prepared real Mediterranean and Italian food. This course is based on the principle that cooking is a way to understand the culture and understanding the culture is a way to better appreciate the cooking. It has both a theoretical and a practical side.

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Italian Culture

Fall (Anthropology, Italian, 3 credits, 200/300-level)
Fall (Anthropology, Italian, 3 credits, 200/300-level)
Spring (Anthropology, Italian, 3 credits, 200/300-level)

Questo corso affronta vari aspetti della cultura italiana attraverso lezioni frontali, letture, video, discussioni, e osservazioni sul campo. L’obiettivo principale è la comprensione della società italiana, includendo la storia più recente, le differenze regionali, le principali istituzioni, e questioni d’attualità. Agli studenti sarà richiesto di riflettere sulla loro formazione culturale, e di condividere le loro esperienze in Italia con il resto della classe. In particolare, si analizzeranno gli stereotipi più comuni allo scopo di rivelare la realtà dell’Italia odierna.

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Italian Gardens and Mediterranean Landscape Design

Spring (Architecture, Art, 3 credits, 300-level)

3 credit option
The area around Viterbo contains several of the most important late Renaissance gardens in the world; students will be able to discover the beauty and hidden meanings of these masterpieces which inspired all later Western garden and landscape design.Concepts explored include: 1) How are these gardens and villas expressions of their cultural, historical and geographic context? What were the major social and economic forces that shaped them? What lessons can be derived from these gardens when considering the forces that shape our own world today? 2) What is the role of the idea, allegory and metaphor in the design of the Italian Renaissance garden? How have these elements influenced later gardens? What narratives from classical history were most common? How are symbolism and iconography used in the garden to give meaning and create place. A number of very different gardens will be visited during fieldtrips and may include: Villa Lante at Bagnaia; Palazzo Farnese at Caprarola; Bosco Sacro at Bomazo; Villa d'Este at Tivoli, Hadrian’s Villa (An ancient Roman summer residence of the emperor) at Tivoli, Hortus Unicorni (a contemporary plantsman’s garden at Bagnoregio, The Tarot Gardens (a contemporary sculpture garden) at Capalbio, Tuscany.

5 credit option
The area around Viterbo contains several of the most important late Renaissance gardens in the world; students will be able to discover the beauty and hidden meanings of these masterpieces which inspired all later Western garden and landscape design. Landscape and garden design is a holistic discipline, whose knowledge includes architectural, artistic, botanical, horticultural, and environmental aspects. In a historic town such as Viterbo, the comprehension of its structure is essential to develop sustainable solutions in a landscape project. The landscape of Viterbo well represents the main issues of the Mediterranean environment in the Italian peninsula. Students will be asked to study the Mediterranean climate, landscape, and most common plants to make their design projects sustainable. Lab activities will be both in class and on-site. Principles of garden design, graphic representation, and planting design will enhance students’ skills and support the project process. A number of very different gardens will be visited during fieldtrips and may include: Villa Lante at Bagnaia; Palazzo Farnese at Caprarola; Bosco Sacro at Bomazo; Villa d'Este at Tivoli, Hadrian’s Villa (An ancient Roman summer residence of the emperor) at Tivoli, Hortus Unicorni (a contemporary plantsman’s garden at Bagnoregio, The Tarot Gardens (a contemporary sculpture garden) at Capalbio, Tuscany.

There is an additional fee of $200 in order to help defray costs of excursions and overnight stays. Taught in English. (Summer Session II)

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Italian Hill Towns: History through Urban Form

Fall (Architecture, Art, History, 3 credits, 300-level)

The splendid hill towns of Italy will be the focus and actual setting for this course. Students are introduced to the development of town-form in Italy from the Roman times through the Medieval and Renaissance periods, by visiting and studying towns and their architecture of walls, towers, piazzas, abbeys and palaces. From Viterbo we will visit towns noteworthy for their rich architectural and historical sites, and experience how these unique towns are lived in today. Visits may include the towns of Orvieto, Siena, Pienza among others. There is a fee of $200 in order to help defray costs of excursions.

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Italian History: Italy in the Medieval Era

Fall (History, 3 credits, 300-level)

Description not available at this time

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Italian Literature in English Translation

Spring (Italian, 3 credits, 200-level)

This course aims to explore several main works on the basis of one of the most fundamental elements through which Italian Literature develops: the self-representation of the poet as a direct or indirect character of his own work. Through this topic it is possible to examine different authors, genres, and periods and still show a coherent evolution of Italian Literature in order to give a representative image of it. Furthermore, accessing biographical sources, it is also possible to give a direct account of writers’ and poets’ lives, including their cultural and social background.

The reading list of this course includes: Dante’s Vita nova and Commedia, Petrarch’s Canzoniere, Cellini’s Vita, Vico’s Autobiografia, Foscolo’s Ortis, Svevo’s Coscienza di Zeno, Ungaretti’s Vita di uomo.

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Mediterranean Landscape Environment

Spring (Geography, 3 credits, 300-level)

This class will explore the environmental features of the Mediterranean landscape from the beginning of its history to the present times, characterized by the concerns for its future conservation. We will start with the description of the geologic history, beginning with the formation of the Mediterranean Sea and the tectonic forces that have created modern Italy. We will reconstruct climatic history and learn how the distinctive Mediterranean climate has evolved. This will lead to a discussion of the distinctive vegetation of the Mediterranean region in contrast with the patches created by land use. We will study the concept of biodiversity and its extent in the Mediterranean landscape, we will analyze human impact on the environmental components and study the efforts for conservation and protection of the natural resources of the Mediterranean basin. The ecology of the Mediterranean natural components will be discussed and displayed also during fieldtrips to various sites in the surroundings of Viterbo (Capalbio, Cimini Mountains, Marmore waterfall, etc).

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Modern Italian History

Spring (History, 3 credits, 300-level)

This course will cover and analyze the history of Modern and Contemporary Italy (end of XVIII century until present times). We will focus on and analyze the events which lead to the process of Nation Building, the spread of ideals such as Liberalism and Nationalism, the unification of Italy under the Kingdom in 1861, the Great War, the rise of the Fascist Regime, the Italian Republic, relations between State and Church, Emigration and Immigration, the Mafia.

By attending this course students will be introduced to the knowledge of modern Italian history and will acquire critical and methodological tools needed to discover and to read the roots and the signs of change of the society, institutions, politics, economy, culture and religion. The analysis of the historical events will also be read to value and compare the different realities of other European countries.

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Roman Civilization

Fall (History, 3 credits, 300-level)

The main goal of this course is to present a general overview of the Roman Civilization as it developed through the century. While our primary focus will be on the history, we will also take into account the social features, the religious life, the literary production as well as the art and architecture of the Roman civilization with particular attention to the impact the Roman heritage had on the development of the Western Civilization. Among some of the questions that will be answered there are:

How did Rome grow and evolve in the context of early Italy?
Which were the political, social and religious features of the Roman Republic?
Which were the main steps through which Rome became the main power in the Mediterranean and how did this grow impact on Rome itself?
Why and how did Rome transform itself from a republic to an empire?
Which were the main characteristics of the Roman empire and how did it change under the rule of the various dynasties?

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Society and Culture in Renaissance Italy

Spring (History, 3 credits, 300-level)

This course examines the changes that Italy underwent from roughly 1350 to 1550. The Renaissance was a break with the traditions of the Middle Ages and the harbinger of Modernity. Particular attention will be given to the intellectual production of the age, attempting to use literary and artistic works as a window to the past. It will be also analyzed the origin of the category of Renaissance in the tradition of historiography as well as some aspects of the social history.

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Southern Italy Field Study

Spring (Italian, 1 credit, 200-level)

This field study course is designed to optimize the benefits of the tour by providing a solid historic and artistic base for studies of Italian culture, art and architecture. The point of departure for the course will be the sites visited on the five-day tour: Sorrento, Naples, Pompeii, Amalfi and Caserta.

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Studio Art I: Advanced Drawing and Painting Italy

Fall (Art, 3 credits, 300-level)
Spring (Art, 3 credits, 300-level)

This course is designed for students who are interested in the practical experience of art. Lectures are held both in the classroom as outside, with outdoor lessons to the historical center of Viterbo, and in nearby villages. The course aims to enhance the individual needs of making art. Advanced concepts of the theory of light and perception of shapes and colors will be the basis on which to set the course. Each student is invited to express themselves and not to pretend impeccable works of art.

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Studio Art I: Beginning Drawing and Painting Italy

Fall (Art, 3 credits, 100-level)
Spring (Art, 3 credits, 100-level)

This course is designed for students who are interested in the practical experience of art. Lectures are held both in the classroom as outside, with outdoor lessons to the historical center of Viterbo, and in nearby villages. The course aims to stimulate and enhance the individual needs of making art. The fundamental concepts of the theory of light and perception of shapes and colors will be the basis on which to set the course. Each student is invited to express themselves and not to pretend impeccable works of art.

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Studio Art II: Advanced Drawing and Painting Italy

Spring (Art, 3 credits, 300-level)

This course is designed for students who are interested in the practical experience of art. Lectures are held both in the classroom as outside, with outdoor lessons to the historical center of Viterbo, and in nearby villages. The course aims to enhance the individual needs of making art. Advanced concepts of the theory of light and perception of shapes and colors will be the basis on which to set the course. Each student is invited to express themselves and not to pretend impeccable works of art.

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Studio Art II: Beginning Drawing and Painting Italy

Spring (Art, 3 credits, 100-level)

This course is designed for students who are interested in the practical experience of art. Lectures are held both in the classroom as outside, with outdoor lessons to the historical center of Viterbo, and in nearby villages. The course aims to stimulate and enhance the individual needs of making art. The fundamental concepts of the theory of light and perception of shapes and colors will be the basis on which to set the course. Each student is invited to express themselves and not to pretend impeccable works of art.

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Sustainable Landscape Design

Spring (Environmental Science, 3 credits, 300-level)

This course presents a sustainability context for the landscape and cityscape design process. Students learn principles and practices that promote landscape owner/occupant comfort and health while protecting and enhancing ecosystems and biodiversity, maintaining and improving air and water quality, conserving natural resources, and reducing long-term operative costs. Readings encompass landscape history and design, sustainable agriculture, best management practices in horticulture and gardening, bio-architecture principles and ecology. Lectures and discussions help students develop a working philosophy of sustainable landscape design. The course deeply and thoroughly discusses the several implications of human relationship to the environment. Field trips to the University of Tuscia’s botanic garden, Villa Lante, Cimini Mountains and Capalbio provide an opportunity to evaluate sustainability in practice (additional fee required for field trips).

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Travel Writing

Spring (English, Journalism, Speech Communications, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course will focus on reading, discussion, and writing of travel journals and essays. We will first examine the history of travel writing with a special, but not exclusive, emphasis on Italy. We will read classic essays by writers such as DH Lawrence and Henry James as well as more contemporary pieces. The course will investigate the main issues of travel writing: place and displacement, identity, and the genius loci while helping students enhance their writing skills.

In addition to reading and preparing for class discussion, students will be required to keep a travel journal, to do writing exercises in class and for homework, and to write, edit, and revise 3 longer essays of 750 words. One of those essays must be an analysis/critique of a piece of travel writing or of the work of a travel writer. Fifteen typed manuscript pages of polished writing must be completed by the end of the course.

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Quick Details

App. Deadline

Nov. 1, 2013

Max Enrollment

50 students

Credit

U.S. credit

Program Type

Specialty

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Instruction

English / Italian

Member

AACUPI-Association of American Colleges and Universities in Italy