Verona, Italy
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Verona, Italy | 2017 Spring

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You must enroll in at least 12 and up to 18 credits. While you may enroll in up to 18 credits, we recommend you enroll in 12-15 credits in order to have time to fully experience the local area's culture and people. Course availability may be subject to change for reasons beyond our control, such as student interest.

Italian Language Studies

Intensive Language Period

All students are required to spend the beginning of the fall and spring semesters taking an intensive six-week Italian language course, which allows for rapid acquisition of language and culture. Language courses generally have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each, but may vary by level. All language courses focus on the skills of speaking, reading, writing, and listening. You may choose one of the following courses:

After the intensive period, students have the option to take an additional language course listed below. You may choose one of the following:

International Management, Business and Italian Studies

Taught in English
The following courses are designed to familiarize you with the region, International Management, Business and Italian Studies as well as provide a multi-disciplinary approach to your studies.

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.unr.edu

Internships

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development particularly in your study abroad setting. USAC internships are considered courses and count as part of your credit load. They can be time-consuming, but are very worthwhile. Students will be working in an authentic local environment, with exposure to the Italian language. Italian language ability is very helpful, but not necessary to complete an internship. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses. Internship credit(s) are only offered in addition to the minimum 12-credit load.

Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview with the internship sponsor on site.

Eligibility—enrollment in Verona program, a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, and junior standing at the time of the internship. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

Course Descriptions

Business Communications

Spring (300-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Corporate Finance

Fall (Finance; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course will examine corporate decision making from the CFO’s perspective regarding their firm’s financing arrangements -- debt/equity mix (e.g., bonds, loans or stocks) and evaluate what the retail landscape has to offer the individual investor thinking of their own retirement and personal portfolio decisions/weights. Business/Financial management topics include the importance of cash flow, especially DCF, the Time Value of Money, Net Present Value, and the volatility of returns given past (and recent) market history. Currency (Exchange Rate Risk), the FX market, will also be considered. Aspects of Business Ethics will be timely and frequent.

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Economic and Political Institutions of the European Union

Fall (Economics, History, Political Science; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Economics, History, Political Science; 300-level; 3 credits)

The creation of the European Union will go down in history as one of the most remarkable achievements of the twentieth century; in less than two generations Europeans fought two appalling wars among themselves, appreciated the dangers of nationalism and sat down to design a system that would make inconceivable that they would ever take up arms against each other again. A body of laws and treaties has been agreed upon and a set of institutions has been created that have altered the political, economic and social landscape of western Europe. The main objective of this class is to gain understanding on how European Union works and about what it means for the millions of people who live under its jurisdiction. Our goal is to provide students with fair understandings of concept of the European market integration within the present framework of globalization, trade liberalization and regionalism. Taught in English.

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Elementary Italian I

Fall (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills.

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Elementary Italian II

Fall (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills. Prerequisite: one semester of college Italian.

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Food and Culture

Spring (Nutrition; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course explores connections between the food people eat and how it supports, or helps define, cultural identity. This includes consideration of how food choices are determined, what ‘good’ food means, and how food production, preparation and consumption contribute to and reflect cultural identity. The course seeks to provide students with theoretical and empirical tools to understand and evaluate food systems at local and global levels.

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Intercultural Communication

Fall (Speech Communications; 300-level; 3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary to build and maintain positive communication and relationships across cultures. Students will explore the definition, nature and manifestation of culture while examining their own values, traditions and beliefs. Through active in-class and out-of-class activities, students will learn about the similarities and differences in communication behaviors and explore language usage, nonverbal style, and perceptions in order to see how they influence face-to-face communication between individuals of different cultures in the United States, Europe and the rest of the world. Course Benefits: Knowledge about diverse communication and observation practices will enhance your ability to study, work and live in any culture of the world. Taught in English.

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Intermediate Italian I

Fall (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intended to further develop Italian language skills, both oral and written. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Particular emphasis on oral skills. Prerequisite: two semesters of college Italian.

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Intermediate Italian II

Fall (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intended to further develop Italian language skills, both oral and written. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Particular emphasis on oral skills. Prerequisite: three semesters of college Italian.

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International Finance

Spring (Finance, International Business; 400-level; 3 credits)

International Finance is a course about the realities of doing business in a multinational environment. Analytical emphasis is placed on understanding the current global financial environment faced by multinational firms. Students and professors engage in analytical discussions regarding international finance processes, systems, strategies, and risk management in order to arrive at the core of the most important elements and actions necessary to successfully manage the financial operations of multinational firms. Topics to be discussed will include foreign exchange markets, international financial markets, international banking, currency derivative markets, risk management & investment decisions in the global marketplace This course is offered as a guided learning/experiential course through USAC Turin. Every student is expected to complete a series of reading, research, and writing assignments and actively participate in discussions of “real world financial analysis”.

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International Marketing

Fall (International Business, Marketing; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (International Business, Marketing; 400-level; 3 credits)

A study of all aspects of marketing unique to international business. This course examines the impact of cultures, ethics, history, politics, and the law on marketing practice in the globalized economy. It also provides knowledge of tools for cultural analysis and discusses issues related to culture, the economy, and all other environmental variables that affect global business. A better understanding of cultural diversity is essential for successful international business, and this course provides a comprehensive perspective. Prerequisite: lower level Business core. Taught in English.

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International Strategic Management

Spring (Management; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course examines strategic operations and functions of international companies. It also explores environments of business in various countries and regions, and the ways that successful businesses, especially multinational companies adapt their operations to international environments.

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Introduction to Photography I

Fall (Art; 100-level; 1 credit)

The course provides a basic approach to how the camera works. Students learn how to express themselves and their ideas in a foreign environment and use their cameras and the techniques acquired as an exciting tool of documentary record, cross-cultural understanding, artistic expression and self-discovery.

Students gain a broad knowledge of the history of photography and an appreciation of aesthetic concerns that enable them to use the camera in a more cohesive and creative manner. Basic classic photography skills including an understanding of focal length, aperture, shutter speed, composition and quality of light are integrated with techniques specific to digital capture and the manipulation of images in Photoshop. Specific assignments help students to learn all basic photographic techniques. A broad view of contemporary photographers work help develop students' critical eye and a clear understanding of what it is that makes a photograph great. During the course students will create a portfolio of images that will both showcase and celebrate their whole unforgettable study abroad experience. Throughout the course they will be able to post their best work on the course website to record and display their experiences.

Students are expected to bring their own camera. Compact cameras are accepted although they do not allow to put in practice all the technical aspects discussed in class. The ideal camera for this class is a digital SLR camera.

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Italian Composition I

Spring (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

Designed to continue expanding accuracy in writing Italian. Covers syntax and idiomatic usage. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Italian.

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Italian Composition II

Spring (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

Designed to continue expanding accuracy in writing Italian. Covers syntax and idiomatic usage. Prerequisite: five semesters of college Italian.

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Italian Conversation

Spring (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course facilitates the acquisition of language necessary to express oneself in daily situations as well as in more difficult contexts. Functionally oriented conversational themes and related vocabulary and phraseology will be introduced for discussion and intensive practice.

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Italian Cuisine

Spring (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

This course is based on the principle that cooking is a way to get to learn the culture, and learning the culture is a way to appreciate the cooking better. It has both a theoretical and a practical side.

The theoretical side consists in discussions and readings on regional history, geography, and social customs. We will discuss Italian food and products, where they came from, how they were used in the past or in the present, and how popular they are, etc. The course should give you some knowledge of the most common dishes of Italian cuisine, especially Northern Italian cuisine.

The practical side consists in learning to prepare typical Italian regional dishes and in sampling them. You will be encouraged to participate by assisting in the preparation of the dishes.

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Italian Culture

Fall (Anthropology, Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Anthropology, Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

Study of Italian culture via discussions of contemporary society and current events. Cross-cultural comparisons will be examined through film, news media and students' experiences in Italy. Taught in English.

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Operations Management

Fall (Management; 300-level; 3 credits)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the concepts and techniques of Operations Management across all activities of an organization and for all types of processes. Basic methods of analysis to support decision-making will be presented. On completion of the course, the student should be able to identify appropriate analytical techniques for given decisions, perform basic quantitative analyses using these methods, and make basic judgements regarding effective management of operations in manufacturing and service environments. Prerequisite: lower level Business core. Taught in English.

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Roman Art and Architecture: Verona and Veneto Region

Spring (Architecture, Art; 400-level; 3 credits)

A History of Roman art and architecture: styles, techniques, materials and methods, from the Etruscan Rome, through the Republic, the Age of Augustus, the Empire and the late ‘decadence’, including art and architecture of the Provinces.

Method: Illustrated lectures and site visits. Classes and lectures will be held in English.

Teaching methods include:

 Lectures and class discussion;

 Assigned readings and class discussion;

 Web researches;

 Videos;

 Students-led seminaries and students’ presentations;

 In-class group activities.

 Museums and sites visits.

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Twentieth-Century Art

Fall (Art; 300-level; 3 credits)

This advanced-level course provides a historical overview of the major ideas, social and political events, artists and art movement of the 20th Century. Throughout the course, we will engage with a wide variety of media from the last century including painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, collage, manifestos, sound art, film, design, architecture, performance art, and new media installations. Lectures will be presented in conjunction with in-class discussions. The course will incorporate visits to local museums and art collections. Special attention will be given to Italian art movements – such as Futurism and Arte Povera. The final grade will be based upon in-class activities, a museum essay, and mid-semester and final examinations.

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Quick Details

2017-18 App. Cycle

Summer I (5 weeks): Open

Summer I & II (8 weeks): Open

Summer II (3 weeks): Open

Fall or Yearlong: Open

Spring: Open

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

U.S. Credit

Program Capacity

60 students

Instruction

English | Italian

Member

AACUPI--Association of American Colleges and Universities in Italy