Torino, Italy
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Torino, Italy | 2017-18 Yearlong

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Academics

You will enroll in 12 to 18 credits per semester comprised of Italian language study plus electives in business, international management and Italian studies. Course availability is contingent upon student enrollment and is subject to change.

Italian Language Studies

All students are required to spend the beginning of the fall and spring semesters taking an intensive six-week Italian language course, which allows for rapid acquisition of language and culture. Language courses generally have a maximum enrollment of 15 students each, but may vary by level. All language courses focus on the skills of speaking, reading, writing, and listening. You may choose one of the following courses:

  • Elementary Italian I (ITAL, 100-level, 4 credits, intensive period)
  • Intermediate Italian I (ITAL, 200-level, 3 credits, intensive period) Prerequisite: two semesters of college Italian or Elementary Italian II.
  • Italian Composition I (ITAL, 300-level, 3 credits, intensive period) Prerequisite: four semesters of college Italian or Intermediate Italian II.

After the intensive period, students have the option to take one additional language course and/or Italian Conversation. You may choose from the following:

Fall Semester

International Management, Business and Italian Studies

Taught in English

Spring Semester

International Management, Business and Italian Studies

Taught in English

Field Studies

USAC helps you explore the historical, cultural, and natural features of the region with carefully planned excursions and field trips. These experiences combined with academic components (readings, research, lectures, written assignments, etc) deepen your understanding of the subject matter. The Viticulture Business Field Study course is an example of this type of course; projects will be assigned and graded as part of the final evaluation and students will be required to keep a “portfolio journal” using writing and photography. A final oral presentation may be assigned.

Internships

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development. They are considered courses and count as part of your credit load. Students will be working in an authentic local environment, with exposure to the Italian language. Italian language ability is very helpful, but not necessary. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses. Internship credit(s) are only offered in addition to the minimum 12-credit load.

Torino internships have mainly been in architecture/design; communications and marketing, but are not limited to these areas. Prior placements have included: architecture studios, car/ industrial/ urban design; graphic design; furniture design and design with recycled materials; tutoring English and assisting in English classes and after-school activities; designing marketing / advertising materials for architects, communications firm; promotion and assistance of USAC; translating, video making, public speaking/cultural presentations. Additional options with local and international companies may be available. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview with the internship sponsor on site.

Eligibility: enrollment in Torino program, a minimum GPA of 3.0, and junior standing at the time of the internship. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

Host University Courses

The University of Torino offers a wide variety of courses for students with a strong command of Italian. A limited number of additional courses may be available in English. These are a great way to immerse yourself in the local university and make friends outside of your USAC courses. Keep in mind that these courses need to be taken in addition to your full time USAC course load and transfer of credit is not guaranteed. Your Resident Director must approve and will help you to compile a course schedule that will accommodate both USAC and the University of Torino’s calendars.

Course Descriptions

Business Ethics and Fair trade

Fall (General Business, Law; 300-level; 3 credits)

Globalization offers our world new, exciting opportunities, but also sets challenges to business, international trade, people’s welfare in developing (and developed…) countries, human and social rights, environmental matters… New rules are gradually being shaped in order to direct this worldwide process towards sustainable development and increasing wellbeing of people; frequently, however, their practical impact is not as strong as envisaged. The course is designed to highlight these challenges, rules and critical aspects. It is an interactive course, based predominantly on discussing examples of ethical dilemmas, international rules, practical experiences and cases.

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Business Leadership, Management and Teamwork

Fall (General Business, Management; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (General Business, Management; 400-level; 3 credits)

Course Objections: Increase participant’s awareness related to communication style, the ability to influence others, and their leadership competencies. Provide concepts and tools with the scope of acquiring and improving skills. Experience applying the concepts of leadership, teamwork, and negotiation. Learn and apply the concepts of leadership, teamwork and negotiation. Increase understanding of the definitions, characteristics, and contexts related to leadership. Further develop skills of speaking and presenting in group contexts. Develop a personal action plan for the improvement of related skills.

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Comparative Government and World Politics

Spring (Political Science; 200-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Creating a Model United Nations: International Politics and Diplomacy

Fall (International Affairs, Political Science; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the activities of the United Nations, as well as providing an understanding of the modalities of international politics and diplomacy. This course will include discussion of current events, salient international issues, topics of international law and some of the procedures of diplomacy. We will examine main points about the history and purpose of diplomacy as well as its relationship to international politics and affairs.

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Economic and Political Institutions of the European Union

Fall (Economics, History, Political Science; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Economics, History, Political Science; 300-level; 3 credits)

The creation of the European Union will go down in history as one of the most remarkable achievements of the twentieth century; in less than two generations Europeans fought two appalling wars among themselves, appreciated the dangers of nationalism and sat down to design a system that would make inconceivable that they would ever take up arms against each other again. A body of laws and treaties has been agreed upon and a set of institutions has been created that have altered the political, economic and social landscape of western Europe. The main objective of this class is to gain understanding on how European Union works and about what it means for the millions of people who live under its jurisdiction. Our goal is to provide students with fair understandings of concept of the European market integration within the present framework of globalization, trade liberalization and regionalism. Taught in English. (Fall semester)

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Elementary Italian I

Fall (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills.

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Elementary Italian II

Fall (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Italian; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills. Prerequisite: one semester of college Italian.

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Human Resource Management

Spring (Management; 300-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Intercultural Communication

Fall (Speech Communications; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Speech Communications; 300-level; 3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary to build and maintain positive communication and relationships across cultures. Students will explore the definition, nature and manifestation of culture while examining their own values, traditions and beliefs. Through active in-class and out-of-class activities, students will learn about the similarities and differences in communication behaviors and explore language usage, nonverbal style, and perceptions in order to see how they influence face-to-face communication between individuals of different cultures in the United States, Europe and the rest of the world. Course Benefits: Knowledge about diverse communication and observation practices will enhance your ability to study, work and live in any culture of the world. Taught in English.

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Intermediate Italian I

Fall (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intended to further develop Italian language skills, both oral and written. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Particular emphasis on oral skills. Prerequisite: two semesters of college Italian.

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Intermediate Italian II

Fall (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

Intended to further develop Italian language skills, both oral and written. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Particular emphasis on oral skills. Prerequisite: three semesters of college Italian.

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International Marketing

Spring (International Business, Marketing; 400-level; 3 credits)

A study of all aspects of marketing unique to international business. This course examines the impact of cultures, ethics, history, politics, and the law on marketing practice in the globalized economy. It also provides knowledge of tools for cultural analysis and discusses issues related to culture, the economy, and all other environmental variables that affect global business. A better understanding of cultural diversity is essential for successful international business, and this course provides a comprehensive perspective. Prerequisite: lower level Business core. Taught in English. (Spring semester)

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Italian Cinema in English Translation: Twentieth-Century Italy Through the Lens of the Cinema

Fall (Art, Film, Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

This film course serves as a key to understanding Italian society through a wide-ranging historical look at Italian cinema. The course introduces the history of Italian film and its major genres, studies the relationship of film to literature and the performing arts, and examines films currently released in the commercial and the film festival circuits. Torino, birthplace of Italian cinema, is the ideal site for the course – also for the National cinema museum at the Mole tower.

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Italian Composition I

Fall (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

Designed to continue expanding accuracy in writing Italian. Covers syntax and idiomatic usage. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Italian.

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Italian Composition II

Fall (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

Designed to continue expanding accuracy in writing Italian. Covers syntax and idiomatic usage. Prerequisite: five semesters of college Italian.

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Italian Conversation

Fall (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Italian; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course facilitates the acquisition of language necessary to express oneself in daily situations as well as in more difficult contexts. Functionally oriented conversational themes and related vocabulary and phraseology will be introduced for discussion and intensive practice.

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Italian Cuisine

Fall (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

Students are given the opportunity to observe the art of preparing Italian foods and study the relationship between food and culture. USAC provides instruction and facilities for this cooking class. Each student is charged a separate, non-refundable fee of $280 to help pay for the ingredients. This fee also entitles you to enjoy the great dishes that are prepared in class! Taught in English.

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Italian Culture

Fall (Anthropology, Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Anthropology, Italian; 200-level; 3 credits)

Study of Italian culture via discussions of contemporary society and current events. Cross-cultural comparisons will be examined through film, news media and students' experiences in Italy. Taught in English.

Questo corso affronta vari aspetti della cultura italiana attraverso lezioni frontali, letture, video, discussioni, e osservazioni sul campo. L’obiettivo principale è la comprensione della società italiana, includendo la storia più recente, le differenze regionali, le principali istituzioni, e questioni d’attualità. Agli studenti sarà richiesto di riflettere sulla loro formazione culturale, e di condividere le loro esperienze in Italia con il resto della classe. In particolare, si analizzeranno gli stereotipi più comuni allo scopo di rivelare la realtà dell’Italia odierna.

***The 200 level class is taught in English and the 300 level class is taught in Italian***

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Marketing Principles

Fall (Marketing; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course on Marketing Principles is designed to teach you the fundamental concepts involved in the marketing function of modern organizations. The focus is on surveying the range of concepts and issues in the marketing of products and services to consumers. This is done in two steps: first, you are taught how to understand the marketing environment (MARKET ANALYSIS), and then you are taught how to implement successful marketing strategies in such an environment (MARKETING STRATEGY). The course is based on a combination of lectures/discussions, business cases, videos, outside speakers, company visits, country snapshots and a final marketing project in which student teams introduce a product or service into the Italian market.

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Modern Architecture

Fall (Architecture, Art; 300-level; 3 credits)

The history of modern architecture from the late 18th century to 1965. The course considers the "prehistory" of modern architecture and follows its development as a new architecture by addressing rapidly changing cultural, economic and technological forces unleashed by the Industrial Revolution and modern science.

Lectures will be presented in conjunction with engaging in-class activities. Video watching, online researches, readings, writings and drawings will be a completing part of the course program and will amplify the work done in class.

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Operations Management

Fall (Management; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Management; 300-level; 3 credits)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the concepts and techniques of Operations Management across all activities of an organization and for all types of processes. Basic methods of analysis to support decision-making will be presented. On completion of the course, the student should be able to identify appropriate analytical techniques for given decisions, perform basic quantitative analyses using these methods, and make basic judgements regarding effective management of operations in manufacturing and service environments. Prerequisite: lower level Business core. Taught in English. (Fall semester)

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Twentieth-Century Art

Spring (Art History; 300-level; 3 credits)

This advanced-level course provides a historical overview of the major ideas, social and political events, artists and art movement of the 20th Century. Throughout the course, we will engage with a wide variety of media from the last century including painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, collage, manifestos, sound art, film, design, architecture, performance art, and new media installations. Lectures will be presented in conjunction with in-class discussions. The course will incorporate visits to local museums and art collections. Special attention will be given to Italian art movements – such as Futurism and Arte Povera. The final grade will be based upon in-class activities, a museum essay, and mid-semester and final examinations.

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Urban History of the City: from Ancient to Modern

Spring (400-level; 3 credits)

The course aims to analyze the most relevant moments that marked the European and North American urban history over the centuries (from the Ancient city to the most recent transformation). Addressing a number of case studies that mirror different models of growth, development, design and planning of the cities from the Greek City to the modern city (i.e. the industrial city, the garden city, the city beautiful, the vertical city, the suburban city, the orthogonal city, the linear city…). An urban vision per period will be selected and analyzed in class, not only from the standpoint of the spatial transformation but also observed within the frame of the political, economic and social change that generated the urban models.

While lectures will provide the framework of the course, a series of visits will offer the students the possibility to observe the implementation of some of the urban experiences addressed in class at the local level. In fact, the city of Turin will provide an interesting laboratory to investigate the application of the studied urban visions: through the guided visits the students will be able to analyze the most relevant phases of the local urban history and of the planning, development and transformation of the city: from the Roman city to the Medieval City, from the Baroque City to the industrial City, from to the city of the economic miracle to the Olympic City.

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Viticulture Business Field Study

Fall (Agriculture, General Business; 300-level; 1 credit)

This field study course is designed to provide students an academic and cultural experience of visiting and learning from vineyards in the Torino countryside area called the Langhe (which was recently honored as a UNESCO world heritage site). The aim is to familiarize students with the deep, complex and ancient wine culture in Italy and specifically the region of Piemonte. Students will visit the locations, learn hands-on in the fields about the harvest, growing and care procedures related to the grapes and vines; students will learn and observe inside the small and large vinification facilities to understand better the physical process of creating wine—up to the corking, bottling and packaging process. Wine making / wine business experts will lead the lessons and discussions about the business of winemaking, marketing, promotion, shipping, exporting, operations, logistics etc. National laws, policies, procedures, along with traditions, beliefs and practices will be addressed. Cultural differences, as well as differences in small and large, family and corporate-run vineyards will be addressed.

The vineyards / companies we will visit were chosen purposely for their varying sizes, styles, focuses and products, in order to provide an authentic and thorough learning opportunity for students. The course takes place in the Fall semester only, the ideal time of the year to take advantage of the seasonal festivities and viticultural activities around the region.

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Quick Details

2017-18 App. Cycle

Summer II (5 weeks): Contact USAC

Fall: Waitlist

Yearlong: Waitlist

Spring: Open

2018-19 App. Cycle

Application opens 9/1:

Summer I (5 weeks)

Summer II (5 weeks)

Summer I & II (10 wks.)

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

U.S. Credit

Program Capacity

65 students

Instruction

English | Italian

Member

AACUPI--Association of American Colleges and Universities in Italy