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Course Information

Bangalore, India | 2013 Fall

Taught in English

You may enroll in 12-18 credits. This list of courses is subject to minor changes; course availability is subject to student interest and enrollment. Visit the USAC website for complete course descriptions. Prerequisites for all courses will be verified during course registration. The following courses are designed to help familiarize you with the region and provide a multi-disciplinary approach to your studies. You are required to take Service Learning during your first semester in India.

Fall Semester

  • Bangalored: Business Relationships between India and the United States (BUS/PSC, 400-level, 1 credit)
  • Bollywood Dance (no credit)
  • Buddhism and Hinduism in Contemporary Society (REL/SOC, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Contemporary Political and Economic Issues in South Asia (ECON/PSC, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Indian Cuisine (no credit) This course has an additional fee for materials.
  • Indian Culture and Traditions (ANTH, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • International Marketing (BUS/MKT, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Introduction to Hindi Language (FLL, 100-level, 1 credit)
  • Introduction to Kannada Language (FLL, 100-level, 1 credit)
  • Introduction to Sanskrit Language (FLL, 100-level, 1 credit)
  • Service Learning (SOC/SW, 400-level, 1 credit, required for all students during their first semester in India)
  • Social Problems: Population and Poverty (SOC, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Social Problems: Population and Poverty Field Study (SOC, 400-level, 1 credit) Social Problems: Population and Poverty must be taken concurrently.
  • Social Problems: Women's Issues in Indian Society (SOC/WS, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Social Problems: Women's Issues Field Study (SOC/WS, 400-level, 1 credit) Social Problems: Women's Issues in Indian Society must be taken concurrently.
  • Yoga (PEX, 100-level, 1 credit)

Spring Semester

  • Bangalored: Business Relationships between India and the United States (BUS/PSC, 400-level, 1 credit)
  • Bollywood Cinema (ART/FILM, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Bollywood Dance (no credit)
  • Buddhism and Hinduism in Contemporary Society (REL/SOC, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Contemporary Political and Economic Issues in South Asia (ECON/PSC, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Global Media and International Markets (COM/MKT, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Indian Art and Architecture (ART/ARCH, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Indian Cuisine (no credit) This course has an additional fee for materials.
  • Indian Culture and Traditions (ANTH, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • International Business (BUS, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Introduction to Hindi Language (FLL, 100-level, 1 credit)
  • Introduction to Kannada Language (FLL, 100-level, 1 credit)
  • Introduction to Sanskrit Language (FLL, 100-level, 1 credit)
  • Service Learning (SOC/SW, 400-level, 1 credit, required for all students during their first semester in India)
  • Social Problems: Population and Poverty (SOC, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Social Problems: Population and Poverty Field Study (SOC, 400-level, 1 credit) Social Problems: Population and Poverty must be taken concurrently.
  • Social Problems: Women's Issues in Indian Society (SOC/WS, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Social Problems: Women's Issues Field Study (SOC/WS, 400-level, 1 credit) Social Problems: Women's Issues in Indian Society must be taken concurrently.
  • Yoga (PEX, 100-level, 1 credit)

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professor is also teaching as a Visiting Professor.

Dr. Chiara Ferrari | California State University, Chico

Courses Offered (Spring): Bollywood Cinema and Global Media and International Markets

Dr. Ferrari is an Italian trilingual scholar and received her PhD from UCLA. She is Associate Professor in Communication Design and has published the anthology, Beyond Monopoly, Globalization and Contemporary Italian Media, as well as a single-authored volume entitled Since When is Fran Drescher Jewish?

Course Descriptions

Bangalored: Business Relationships between India and the United States

Fall (International Business, Political Science, 1 credit, 400-level)
Spring (International Business, Political Science, 1 credit, 400-level)

India is rapidly on its journey to become an Economic Superpower. It is predicted to be amongst the top three global superpowers by 2030 and perhaps the leader by 2050. Bangalore (and Karnataka) is one of India’s most important cities and has played a critical role in this journey. A more critical role is envisaged for this metropolis in future. The visionaries and business leaders of this city have played an important role in shaping it’s destiny and the exciting onward journey will require new leaders and visionaries to take over the mantle.

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Bollywood Cinema

Spring (Art, Film, 3 credits, 300-level)

Description not available at this time

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Bollywood Dance

Fall (level information n/a)
Spring (level information n/a)

The film industry in India, and Mumbai - based Hindi language is what gives us the name Bollywood. Bollywood is the commercial name for modern Indian dancing and combines classical Indian dance, folk dance and even has Arabic and Latino influence. The dance style is very expressive and has a great deal of meaning in the music of films. You will learn to express what the music means in the films of Bollywood. This non-credit class will teach you the very basic, graceful moves. With regular and dedicated practice you would be able to dance in perfect harmony and style in tune with Indian music in the backdrop.

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Buddhism and Hinduism in Contemporary Society

Fall (Religious Studies, Sociology, 3 credits, 400-level)
Spring (Religious Studies, Sociology, 3 credits, 400-level)

What is Hinduism and what is Buddhism? How has Buddhism evolved? This course involves a historical and thematic survey of the Buddhist traditions from the time of the Buddha until the present. We explore some of the Buddhist teachings and practices and its interactions with other cultures in the world and how it has undergone changes. The course does not aim to be comprehensive but introduces the student to some of the enduring themes of Buddhism.
Hinduism gives a bird’s eye view of the scriptures, their doctrines, rituals and traditions. While highlighting the influence of Hinduism on Indian culture the course will stimulate reflection on its pluralism and of human liberation in the Indian context.

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Contemporary Political and Economic Issues in South Asia

Fall (Economics, Political Science, 3 credits, 400-level)
Spring (Economics, Political Science, 3 credits, 400-level)

India is the dominant power in South Asia; it has intervened in the civil war in Sri Lanka, controlled fuel imports into landlocked Nepal, and negotiated a nuclear stand-off with Pakistan. As India now transforms itself into a global economic powerhouse, its regional economic prowess will match or even surpass its political influence. In this course we will focus primarily on India, but we’ll also take into account contemporary political and economic events and issues in neighboring countries. Texts will include classics such as Rudolph's "In Pursuit of Lakshmi" and more recent articles in India’s Economic & Political Weekly.

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Global Media and International Markets

Spring (Marketing, 3 credits, 300-level)

This course examines media ownership, content flow and reformatting, international media policy and cultural values to investigate one of today's most used and discussed terms: globalization. Lectures, readings, and clips screened in class explore how history (colonialism and international relations), industrialization ("First World" vs. "Third World"), political power (media imperialism), economics (media corporations and international distribution), and culture (religion, language, world view) shape contemporary communication systems worldwide. In doing so, we will examine international audience reception (focusing on Indian audiences) and national productions (in particular Indian cinema) to investigate the negotiations at play between local and global identities.

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Indian Art and Architecture

Spring (Architecture, Art, 3 credits, 300-level)

The course examines in-depth ideological, theoretical and technical priorities involved in the architectural history of India. Students will learn to understand Indian Art by studying symbols, emblems, postures & gestures which dominate Indian sculptural tradition. The course analyzes the role of the state and society in the design of a monument and usage of architectural space. The students will also analyze the interplay of power, racial, caste and class considerations that determined the size and style of a structure, by examining who constructed what and when they constructed it. Major monuments such as the Kailasa Temple in Ellora, the Taj Mahal in Delhi, and historical parts of Bangalore will be studied. Apart from class room lectures teaching will also involve.
Apart from class room lectures teaching will also involve:
• Field Trips to prominent architectural centers such as Hampi.
• Visiting Museums and Galleries.
• Examining photographs and map work.
• Walk around the city, visiting specific areas of Bangalore such as trade,
• Cultural centers, core areas, historical parts of the city.
• Watching and analyzing movies.

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Indian Cuisine

Fall (Nutrition, 0 credits, level information n/a)
Spring (Nutrition, 0 credits, level information n/a)

A practical oriented course focusing on Indian cooking, their trends and practices

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Indian Culture and Traditions

Fall (Anthropology, 3 credits, 300-level)
Spring (Anthropology, 3 credits, 300-level)

The course examines the main areas of Indian culture including historical writings, Indian traditions, formulation of ideologies through intellectual debates, and the variety of jewelery, textiles and performing arts in traditional to Indian culture. Students will read the epics Mahabharata and Ramayana and other classical texts, like Panchatantra and discuss the concepts of state, ethics, and polity raised in these texts. Students will be familiarized with visual representations of Indian culture like jewelery and dance forms. The course includes:
I. Field Trips to
a. Hindu Monasteries.
b. Textile manufacturing unit’s
c. Jewellery Houses
d. Classical dance performances.
II. Extensive use of specific ‘Study Materials’ such as
a. Textiles Silk & Cotton
b. Maps
c. Jewels of Gold, Silver, Lacque, Wood and other medium
d. Photographs and Picture plates.

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International Business

Spring (International Business, Management, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course is designed to introduce students to the realities of doing business in a world where 1) political boundaries and barriers are falling and the bottom line might be determined by events in Beijing, Berlin, or Brasilia as in your home market; 2) the products we use everyday are just as likely to have originated in India, Italy or Indonesia as in Idaho; and 3) international institutions, such as the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund may have a more significant impact upon our business transactions than our state legislature.

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International Marketing

Fall (International Business, Marketing, 3 credits, 400-level)

The International Business course will provide students with a sound grounding in the exciting world of Global Business. It will provide a macro overview of the history and importance of globalization and global trade, and drill down to the micro aspects of understanding the nuances of planning, strategy and execution for creating businesses with a global outlook successfully.

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Introduction to Hindi Language

Fall (Hindi, 1 credit, 100-level)
Spring (Hindi, 1 credit, 100-level)

This course will introduce students to Hindi and its literary heritage. After completing this course students will be able to communicate in basic Hindi. When a student wants to travel throughout India this will help them to negotiate with the local population, as Hindi is the national language, it is widely spoken in all parts.

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Introduction to Kannada Language

Fall (Kannada, 1 credit, 100-level)
Spring (Kannada, 1 credit, 100-level)

This course will introduce students to the Kannada language spoken in India and its literary heritage. This course will help the students manage in daily situations while studying in India. The development of communication strategies will allow the students to cope with problems that arise in everyday interaction and to relate linguistic learning with the development of a cultural competence. When a student wants to travel throughout India this will help them to negotiate with the local population, as Kannada is the local language in Bangalore.

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Introduction to Sanskrit Language

Fall (Sanskrit, 1 credit, 100-level)
Spring (Sanskrit, 1 credit, 100-level)

Sanskrit is an Indo-European classical language of India and a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. It has a position in India and Southeast Asia similar to that of Latin and Greek in Europe, and is a central part of Hindu tradition. It is one of the oldest Indo-European languages in the world with a documented history of 4,000 years and boasts a rich tradition of poetry, literature; as well as scientific, technical, philosophical and religious texts. Sanskrit is one of the 22 official languages of India.

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Service Learning

Fall (Service Learning, Social Work, Sociology, 1 credit, 300-level)
Spring (Service Learning, Social Work, Sociology, 1 credit, 300-level)

Service learning combines community service with academic instruction, focusing on critical, reflective thinking and personal and civic responsibility. Service learning programs involve students in activities that address community-identified needs, while developing their academic skills and commitment to their community.

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Social Problems: Population and Poverty

Fall (Sociology, 3 credits, 400-level)
Spring (Sociology, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course on ‘Social Issues: Population and Poverty’ focuses on India which is one of the population giants in the world today. The Course enables students to understand the dynamics of population growth across the world and the significance of population composition.It gives the students the theoretical base which would enable them to critically examine and analyze this. The course examines the socio cultural factors that influence demographic behavior. Data from the 2011 Census will be used to study the emerging trends.
The course focuses on Poverty in India, examine its definitions, ramifications and also explore its interrelationship with the population. The Government of India’s programs to alleviate poverty are scrutinized.

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Social Problems: Population and Poverty Field Study

Fall (Sociology, 1 credit, 400-level)
Spring (Sociology, 1 credit, 400-level)

Field-based learning in conjunction with the Social Problems: Population & Poverty course. Course objectives include: understanding the theoretical approaches for examining social problems and issues; acquisition of informed knowledge about selected problems and issues; explanation for the subjugation of women and the gender dimensions of each social problem, and a generalization of reasoning abilities from specific problems to a general perspective.

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Social Problems: Women's Issues Field Study

Fall (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies, 1 credit, 400-level)
Spring (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies, 1 credit, 400-level)

Field-based learning in conjunction with the Social Problems: Women's Issues course. Course objectives include: understanding the theoretical approaches for examining social problems and issues; acquisition of informed knowledge about selected problems and issues; explanation for the subjugation of women and the gender dimensions of each social problem, and a generalization of reasoning abilities from specific problems to a general perspective.

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Social Problems: Women's Issues in Indian Society

Fall (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies, 3 credits, 400-level)
Spring (Sociology, Women's Studies / Gender Studies, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course aims at enabling the student to study both the structure of society and individual lives at the same time. This course will help them understand the problems and issues in Indian society in the context of wider social forces. This course will also try to create a social sensitivity among students on the issues of subjugation and oppression prevalent against women in Indian society; therefore, each problem is studied from a gender point of view. The hours spent in the field will enhance the students’ knowledge and understanding of the various social problems that women face in the society and will expose them to the many organizations that work to prevent discrimination and exploitation of women and that lend a hand in empowering women.

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Yoga

Fall (Recreation / Physical Education, 1 credit, 100-level)
Spring (Recreation / Physical Education, 1 credit, 100-level)

Instruction in the practice of Yoga. General philosophy, history, and wellness benefits will be included. Emphasis is placed on the performance of ananas (postures), pranayamas (breathing exercises), dharanas (concentration exercises), and dhyanas (meditation and relaxation techniques) in order to improve wellness.

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Quick Details

App. Deadline

Jun. 15, 2013

Max Enrollment

40 students

Credit

U.S. credit

Program Type

Specialty

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5, Class standing: Sophomore

Instruction

English / Sanskrit / Hindi / Kannada