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Course Information

Lüneburg, Germany | 2013-14 Yearlong

You may enroll in 12-18 credits. This list of courses is subject to minor changes; course availability is subject to student interest and enrollment. Please visit the USAC website for complete course descriptions. Prerequisites for all courses will be verified during course registration.

German Language Studies

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks as well as elective language and literature courses. The  track courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in the track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it. Language course sections are kept to a maximum enrollment of 15 students each. All students are required to enroll in the courses listed for the appropriate language track plus language and literature elective courses and/or courses from German Studies or Engineering for a total of 12-18 credits.

Track I (14 credits)—Prerequisite: none

  • Elementary German I (FLL, 100-level, 4 credits)
  • Elementary German II (FLL, 100-level, 4 credits)
  • Intermediate German I (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Intermediate German II (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)

Track II (12 credits)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college German

  • Intermediate German I (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Intermediate German II (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • German Composition I (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • German Composition II (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits)

Track III (9 credits)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college German

  • German Composition I (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • German Composition II (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • Advanced German I (FLL, 400-level, 3 credits)

Track IV (9 credits)—Prerequisite: six semesters of college German

  • Advanced German I (FLL, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Advanced German II (FLL, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Seminar in German Language (FLL, 400-level, 3 credits)

Language and Literature Electives

Taught in German

  • Contemporary German Literature (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits, spring only) Track III.
  • German Cinema (FLL/ART/FILM, 200-level, 3 credits) Track III.
  • German Conversation (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits) Track II and above.
  • Introduction to German Literature (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits, fall only) Track II and above.
  • Myths and Legends (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits, spring only) Track III
  • Teaching German as a Foreign Language (FLL, 400/600-level, 3 credits, fall only) Track IV.

German And European Studies

Taught in English or German
The following courses are designed to familiarize you with the region and provide a multi-disciplinary approach to your studies. Courses are taught in English unless noted in German; courses taught in German are for students in Track III or above unless otherwise indicated.

Fall Semester

  • Ethnic Conflict and Diversity in Europe (ANTH/PSC/HIST, 300-level, 3 credits)
  • German Cinema (FLL/ART/FILM, 200-level, 3 credits, taught in German)
  • German-Speaking Europe and Its Cultures (FLL, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • In Search of German Roots: Tracing your Family Genealogy (ANTH/HIST, 100-level, 1 credit)
  • International Affairs since 1945 (PSC, 400/600-level, 3 credits)
  • Internship (up to 3 credits) This course has a refundable fee.
  • Teaching German as a Foreign Language (FLL, 400/600-level, 3 credits, taught in German)
  • The European Union: Processes, Dynamics, and Structures (ECON/PSC, 400-level, 3 credits)

Spring Semester

  • Chemistry and Society (CHEM/ENV, 100-level, 3 credits)
  • German Cinema (FLL/ART/FILM, 200-level, 3 credits, taught in German)
  • Germany 1933-1945: Culture, Society, and Politics in a Dictatorship (HIST/PSC, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Government and Politics in Germany and Europe (PSC, 400/600-level, 3 credits)
  • In Search of German Roots: Tracing your Family Genealogy (ANTH/HIST, 100-level, 1 credit)
  • Intercultural Communication (COM, 400-level, 3 credits)
  • Internship (up to 3 credits) This course has a refundable fee.
  • Myths and Legends (FLL, 300-level, 3 credits, taught in German)
  • Responding to the Challenge of Climate Change (ENV, 200-level, 3 credits)
  • Survey of Art—European/Western Art (ART, 200-level, 3 credits, taught in German)

Engineering

(Fall Semester only)
Taught in English or German
Fall and yearlong students with previous knowledge in Engineering may also take Engineering courses in English and German. Courses taught in English are appropriate for all levels of German proficiency; courses taught in German are appropriate for students on Track IV level. Courses designated as "taught in German and English," are taught in German, with materials and exams available in English. These courses are taught by Leuphana University Lüneburg faculty. Courses are generally focused on Engineering Management and Automation Technology, and are subject to availability. Recent courses available have included:

  • Integrated Circuits (ENGR, 400-level, 3 credits, taught in English)
  • Foundations of Automatic Controlled Systems (ENGR, 400-level, 3 credits, taught in English)

Direct Enrollment at Leuphana University Lüneburg

Taught in German

The Leuphana University Lüneburg offers direct enrollment courses for USAC students. These direct enrollment opportunities are a great way to immerse yourself in the local university and make friends outside of your USAC courses. Keep in mind that these courses need to be taken in addition to your full time USAC course load and transfer of credit is not guaranteed. Your Resident Director must approve and will help you to compile a course schedule that will accommodate both USAC and Leuphana University Lüneburg's calendars.

3-Credit Courses

USAC recommends these options for yearlong students. Advanced German students may directly enroll in one course offered by Leuphana University Lüneburg in the fields of German Literature, Sustainability Sciences, Philosophy, History, Economics, Sociology, Environmental Sciences, or Politics. Leuphana follows a different calendar, with final exams in February (fall semester) or June (spring semester). It may be possible to organize early exams (December and May) on an individual basis, but USAC cannot guarantee this. There will be a $100 deposit for each course, which will be refunded upon completion of the course.

1-Credit Workshops

Students with less advanced German can enroll in workshops offered by Leuphana University Lüneburg. Previous projects offered include engineering projects, music, cinema, radio, etc. Students will pay a $100 deposit for the first project, which will be refunded upon completion. Students are permitted to enroll in a total of two to three workshops; however, only the first workshop is refundable.

German as a Foreign Language (Test DAF) Exams

The Volkshochschule Lüneburg (Adult Education Center) is a well-known public institution created to promote the German language and cultures of German-speaking countries. The Diplomas of German as a Foreign Language (test DAF) are recognized by German employers, professional organizations and universities. As an official "examiner" center, the Volkshochschule Lüneburg offers courses for students interested in taking the beginner, intermediate and advanced exams. The level of the exam goes beyond Track IV. It is attractive to students who consider seeking a degree in Germany and to those who have a chance to work in Germany or in German companies abroad. Costs vary.

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professor is also teaching as a Visiting Professor.

Dr. Andrew Jorgensen | University of Toledo

Courses Offered (Spring): Chemistry and Society and Responding to the Challenge of Climate Change

Dr. Jorgensen (PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago) has devoted three sabbatical leaves to science education projects as well as a leave at the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris. Dr. Jorgensen has won an Outstanding Teaching Award and was twice appointed a Master Teacher. He also serves as vice-chair of the Society Committee on Chemical Education for the American Chemical Society.

Course Descriptions

Advanced German I

Fall (German, 3 credits, 400-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course is designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of advanced language students. Readings are analysed for style, for the meaning of vocabulary in precise context, and serve as the basis for subsequent discussion. Each week complex grammatical topics are introduced and practiced through written and oral exercises. Basic or general notions of style are presented, and students work to strengthen their own personal style through frequent written assignments.

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Advanced German II

Fall (German, 3 credits, 400-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course is designed to improve the knowledge and expressive capabilities of advanced language students. Readings are analyzed for style, for the meaning of vocabulary in precise context, and serve as the basis for subsequent discussion. Each week complex grammatical topics are introduced and practiced through written and oral exercises. Basic or general notions of style are presented, and students work to strengthen their own personal style through frequent written assignments.

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Chemistry and Society

Spring (Chemistry, Environmental Science, 3 credits, 100-level)

A survey of chemistry topics appropriate for non-science majors, including water, energy, food and nutrition, climate change, nuclear fission, the ozone layer, and drugs. The emphasis will be in environmentally-related chemistry. Exercises will include analysis of information from web searches and writing short essays on recent popular publications. The course is designed for non-science majors of all academics areas.

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Contemporary German Literature

Spring (German, 3 credits, 400-level)

Reading and discussion of selected novels, which demonstrate main topics and ideas in contemporary German literature, reappraising German history, the reunifications, and women's literature. Underlying ideas, the particular characteristics of the German people, and universal values, as well as the literary characteristics of the works themselves will be discussed.

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Electrical Drives Technology

Fall (3 credits, 400-level)

The course is divided in four parts.
-The first one: Background on the basic physical laws and principles which govern the working function of electrical drives.
-The second one: Physical principles for the functioning of DC-Motors, their technical structures and their mathematical dynamic models. The models are implemented in Matlab/Simulink.
-The third one: Physical principles for the functioning of Asynchronous-Motors (induction motors), their technical structures for control including Pulse Wide Modulation (PWM), inverter drivers and their mathematical steady-state models. The models are implemented in Matlab/Simulink.
-The fourth one: Physical principles for the functioning of Synchronous-Motors , their technical structures and their mathematical steady-state models. The models are implemented in Matlab/Simulink.
The lectures are organized in two parts: in the first part theoretical aspects are considered. In the second part of the lecture, the explained models are developed into the Matlab Toolbox. Each student has the possibility to implement model and structure presented in the theoretical part by himself.

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Elementary German I

Fall (German, 4 credits, 100-level)
Spring (German, 4 credits, 100-level)

Introduction to the German language through the development of language skills and structural analysis. The fundamentals of German grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary and useful expressions are studied. The goals of these courses are to build reading, writing, listening and, above all, speaking skills. The courses follow the textbooks listed below.

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Elementary German II

Fall (German, 4 credits, 100-level)
Spring (German, 4 credits, 100-level)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills. Prerequisite: one semester of college German.

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Ethnic Conflict and Diversity in Europe

Fall (Anthropology, History, Political Science, 3 credits, 300-level)

With new state-formation, democratization processes and economic transformation in Western Europe, a (re-) emergence of collective identities constructed along cultural, ethnic and religious lines across state boundaries can be observed. They have the inherent potential for profound processes of renewal as well as for violent conflicts. How do specific ethnic and religious groups, society and politics react? What are existing patterns for managing diversity and what new policy models and programs for management of cultural and social pluralism emerge? What happens to minorities involved in these change processes? In this class students will debate diversity and conflict in civil society to get a better understanding for peaceful and democratic decision-making.

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Exploring World Music

Fall (Music, 3 credits, 400-level)

Music and human culture focusing on non-Core Humanities. Representative societies explored. Field study, music-making projects, performance analysis required.

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German Cinema

Fall (German, 3 credits, 200-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 200-level)

The class will give a general survey of German film from the end of the war to the present. It covers the most important films and directors of the "neuer Deutscher Film" and the following generation, the form, content, social relevance, history and acclaim of the film will be discussed and analyzed both in class and at home. Up to two films will be shown. The course is taught in German, an American text on the subjects will be available. (Fall semester)

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German Composition I

Fall (German, 3 credits, 300-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 300-level)

Students are required to write compositions regularly. Part of the class is used to correct the compositions or exercises which the student does outside of class. New grammatical topics are introduced with exercises reinforcing the use of those elements. Part of the class is utilized for selected readings, discussion, vocabulary building and more.

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German Composition II

Fall (German, 3 credits, 300-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 300-level)

Students are required to write compositions regularly. Part of the class is used to correct the compositions or exercises which the student does outside of class. New grammatical topics are introduced with exercises reinforcing the use of those elements. Part of the class is utilized for selected readings, discussion, vocabulary building and more. Prerequisite: five semesters of college German.

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German Conversation

Fall (German, 3 credits, 300-level)

This course is designed to improve the knowledge, listening and expressive capabilities of intermediate/advanced language students. In order to support self-directed, self-paced learning in the second part of this class each USAC student is paired up with a native speaker of German as a language partner. Students are required to meet with their language partner and discuss topics of their choice each week. Basic written assignments, geared to each student’s level, help to solidify written expression. Under instructor supervision students select, manage, and assess their own learning objectives and outcomes to prepare them for successful communication with native speakers. The class provides students with vocabulary, grammar, and structures to enable them to engage effectively in a variety of social and functional settings.

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German Conversation I

Spring (German, 3 credits, 200-level)

Description not available at this time

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German Conversation II

Spring (German, 3 credits, 300-level)

Description not available at this time

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German-Speaking Europe and its Culture

Fall (German, 3 credits, 200-level)

Students will be encouraged to take full advantage of their experience living in Germany by discussing aspects of German culture through an analysis of contemporary readings, current events and excursions.
Different aspects of German culture such as history, economics, art, music, religion etc. will be covered.

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Germany 1933-1945: Culture, Society and Politics in a Dictatorship

Spring (3 credits, 400-level)

To better understand the most infamous two decades of German history, its processes and society we look back in history and uncover historical reasons that might have helped to provide ground for a totalitarian system of hitherto unknown extremes. Some of these catalysts can be found in traditions and events of the previous 60 or 100 years. After this introduction of cultural, economic and political factors special attention is paid to the impact these factors have on daily lives of the Germans of that time. The Historikerstreit and other questions such as resistance movements, reaction of various ethnic groups are objects of examination as well. Finally special attention will be paid to the post 1945 period with the foundation of two separate German states and the way the young Germanies dealt with their past. The seminar closes with a look at the presence of these topics in unified Germany. The schedule may change due to current events

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Government and Politics in Germany and Europe

Spring (Political Science, 3 credits, 400-level)

This class offers an introduction to contemporary problems in the German state. It gives particular emphasis on the political and economic consequences of the German unification and the evolution of the European Union.

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In Search of German Roots: Tracing your Family Genealogy

Fall (Anthropology, History, 1 credit, 100-level)
Spring (Anthropology, History, 1 credit, 100-level)

As a country formed by immigrants from all over Europe, the U.S. has longstanding and deep cultural attachments and family links to Germany. Many students who opt to come to study in Germany do so because of some distant ancestral connection to this country. Germany’s
diasporic relationship to the U.S. means that this seminar also offers insight into the specific socio-historical relationship binding Germany and the U.S . At the same time, immigrants from many other European countries left Europe in the late 19th century through German harbors.

With the availability of extraordinary databases to aid in family research, genealogy has entered into an exciting new era. Germany, and especially the northern part of it (Hamburg, Bremerhaven, etc.) has particularly good resources, as it was frequently the place from which people emigrated, leaving Europe and their homes behind forever.

This seminar will help you find the roots of your family tree by guiding you through some of the rich repositories of records and censuses to help locate you and your family in the 21st century.
You will understand the broad history of migration from Europe to Northern America with the help of an excursion to an emigration museum, and you will receive expert hints from trained on-site archivists and genealogists to help you navigate your way through the extensive collection of archival data and online records.

By the end of this project, you will have a general overview of the genealogist’s tool kit, which should inspire a lifelong interest in your family history.

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Intercultural Communication

Spring (Speech Communications, 3 credits, 400-level)

An analysis of the impact of culture on communication. This course also offers students the opportunity to develop an awareness of cultural differences and the ability to deal with them. Interactions, gestures and communication styles often differ between cultures and can easily lead to misunderstandings. We will analyze our own cultures in order to better understand those around us. The course contents will consist of a theoretical background, application, and active learning elements.

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Intermediate German I

Fall (German, 3 credits, 200-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 200-level)

Extension of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through active preparation for/and participation in classroom activity. More specifically, students will deepen their knowledge of German grammar, they will increase active and passive vocabularies, and achieve some facility in understanding and communicating in conversational German, they will learn to read more complex German texts, they will learn to write more interesting and correct German, they will learn something about modern German culture and history. The courses follow the material as listed below.

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Intermediate German II

Fall (German, 3 credits, 200-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 200-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 200-level)

Extension of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through active preparation for/and participation in classroom activity. More specifically, students will deepen their knowledge of German grammar, they will increase active and passive vocabularies, and achieve some facility in understanding and communicating in conversational German, they will learn to read more complex German texts, they will learn to write more interesting and correct German, they will learn something about modern German culture and history. The courses follow the material as listed below.

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International Affairs since 1945

Fall (Political Science, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course is divided into five parts: Theory, history, international organizations, issues and case studies. It starts with a theoretical approach to International Affairs and provides an overview of structures and organisational developments. The period from 1945 to 1990 is covered, with an emphasis on European events. International organizations, which were created and designed under difficult circumstances, are used by international players to deal with conflicts of interest. We will examine how this works, analysing specific issues and transnational relations.

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Introduction to German Literature

Fall (German, 3 credits, 200-level)

An introduction to German Literature of the 20th century with examples of prose, drama and poetry.

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Myths and Legends

Spring (German, 3 credits, 300-level)

All cultures have developed their own myths and legends, consisting of narratives of their history, religions, and heroes. Myths, legends, and allegories contain great symbolic meaning and this is a major reason why they have survived. They remain today a primary authority in the study of our existence. This course examines how mankind has created these systems and will venture interpretations them in order to find their importance. We will first study a variety of myths and legends from antiquity to the present, with special attention given to Greek, Roman, and North-European Mythology. Secondly we will examine specific topics such as mythological places and creatures. (Taught in German)

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Responding to the Challenge of Climate Change

Spring (Environmental Science, Political Science, 3 credits, 200-level)

The course will include background information on the phenomenon of climate change, how the science is characterized, the impact to life on earth from such changes, and, most importantly, solutions to the challenges of climate change. Exercises will include the review of data, the consideration of models that describe impacts, and the development of plans to mitigate and adapt to climate change. The course is designed for non-science majors of all academics areas.

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Seminar in German Language

Fall (German, 3 credits, 400-level)
Spring (German, 3 credits, 400-level)

Description not available at this time

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Teaching German as a Foreign Language

Fall (German, 3 credits, 400-level)

This course is designed to introduce students to methods and strategies of teaching German as a Foreign Language. We will cover language acquisition theories, linguistics, learning and teaching strategies as well as lesson planning tools and monitoring learning outcomes. Students will observe USAC German classes and apply their skills in small student teaching units. The class addresses students who consider starting a foreign language teaching career as well as students who are already in a teacher training program. The class will also be open to a limited number of native speakers of German in order to enhance further contact between USAC and Leuphana students.

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The European Union: Processes, Dynamics, and Structures

Fall (Economics, Political Science, 3 credits, 400-level)

The course provides a general introduction to the European Union. After examining the history of European integration and the political and economic context in which it developed, we cover the main institutions Commission, Council, and Parliament and their role in day to day politics. Students then learn about political theories of integration and study how scholars explain the establishment of the EU and its impact on the nation states and their economies. In the final part of the class we analyze core EU policies, such as environmental and economic policies.

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Quick Details

App. Deadline

Jun. 15, 2013

Max Enrollment

60 students

Credit

U.S. credit

Program Type

Specialty

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Instruction

English / German