Lyon, France
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Lyon, France | 2017 Spring

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

USAC students enroll in a minimum of 12 credits in intensive French language courses at the Institute of French Studies with other international students. A placement test will be administered before the semester to help place students into the appropriate language level.

You may also enroll in one or two USAC elective course in French and European Studies (see below) or a course at Université Lumiére Lyon 2. The Resident Director will assist you in identifying an appropriate course. A maximum of 18 credits may be taken per semester. Course availability may be subject to change for reasons beyond our control, such as student interest.

Grades are typically not ready until one or two weeks after exams are completed. Check your Credits, Courses, and Transcripts document in Gateway for details specific to your host university. The transcript evaluation and grade reporting process at your home university will also take time after your overseas transcript arrives. If you plan to study here during your senior year, review your home university requirements carefully to allow enough time for grades to be posted for graduation. Plan to work ahead with your academic advisor if you will be using your study abroad coursework to meet prerequisites back at home.

French Language Courses

  • Second Year French I (FLL/FREN, 200-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: two semesters of college French
  • Second Year French II (FREN, 200-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: three semesters of college French
  • Third Year French I (FREN, 300-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: four semesters of college French
  • Third Year French II (FREN, 300-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: five semesters of college French
  • Fourth Year French I (FREN, 400-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: six semesters of college French
  • Fourth Year French II (FREN, 400-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: seven semesters of college French
  • French Stylistics (FREN, 400-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: six semesters of college French
  • French Conversation (FREN, 300-level, 3 credits) Prerequisite: two semesters of college French (second year students and above).
  • Seminar in French Language (FREN, 400/600-level, 3 credits, taught in French) Prerequisite: six semesters of college French.

French and European Studies

Taught in English or French
The following elective courses are designed to familiarize you with the region and provide a multi-disciplinary approach to your studies. Courses are taught in English unless noted; courses taught in French are appropriate for third-year students or above unless otherwise indicated.

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.unr.edu

Field Studies

USAC helps you explore the historical, cultural, and natural features of the region with carefully planned tours. If taken for credit, added academic requirements (readings, research, written assignments, reports etc.) deepen your experience, turning a tour into a Field Study which counts as part of your credit load. The Marseille and the Mediterranean Sea and Provence and Avignon Field Study courses are examples of this type of course.

Host University Courses

Taught in French and English
Université Lumiére Lyon 2 provides the unique opportunity to enroll in regular courses taught by French university professors. This will give you a chance to meet students outside of USAC and experience a typical French class. Courses are offered in business, economics, international relations, English literature and grammar, and more. Keep in mind that these courses need to be taken in addition to your full time USAC course load and transfer of credit is not guaranteed. Your Resident Director must approve and will help you to compile a course schedule that will accommodate both USAC and the Université Lumiére Lyon 2 calendars.

Work with your Resident Director to determine your options and to avoid conflicts with your USAC class schedule. Université Lumiére

Lyon 2 course grades will not be part of your official USAC record, however USAC will forward a letter or certificate of completion that is provided by the host university. Work closely with your home advisor and prepare to describe your Lyon course carefully when you return. Be ready to provide a copy of your syllabus, all class materials, and your graded assignments for evaluation. Any other courses taken at Université Lumiére Lyon 2 are taken in addition to your USAC classes and do not replace USAC credits for full-time status.

French as Foreign Language Exams

As an official “examiner” center, Université Lumière Lyon 2 offers French proficiency exams (Diplôme Universitaire d’Etudes Françaises (DUEF)) at all levels: beginner, intermediate, and advanced exams. Students who elect to take and successfully pass the DUEF exam at the end of the semester will be awarded the internationally recognized certification. Although the DUEF exam is not a required part of the course, the process of preparing for this exam contributes to an even greater development of the student's French language proficiency.The cost for this exam is included in your program fees.

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professor is also teaching as a Visiting Professor.

Fall Semester:

Dr. Jennifer Hill | University of Nevada

Courses offered:

Dr. Hill holds MFA and PhD degrees from Cornell University. She is an award-winning teacher and her research interests include nineteenth- century British literature and culture, popular literature, and creative writing. As an undergraduate, she spent a year in Paris.

Spring Semester:

Dr. Joseph Mai | Clemson University

Courses offered:

Dr. Joseph Mai (Ph.D. Yale University) teaches French cinema and literature at Clemson University. He is the author of one book on the Dardenne Brothers and is completing work on another devoted to Robert Guédiguian. He has also published on the French novel. A former exchange student at the Ecole Normale Supériure, he has also previously taugth in Angers, France.

Course Descriptions

Food, Culture, and Literature

Fall (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course introduces students the literature and culture of food and food writing through critical encounters with literary classics and popular literature, as well as critical writing and theory about food, culture, and politics. In addition to reading and writing critically and creatively about food and food culture, students will learn about research and ethics in the context of food production and consumption.

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Fourth Year French I

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

This advanced level course of French has been designed for students who have completed three years of French and although they may manage in completing daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course offers the students the opportunity to enhance their vocabulary in specific and technical areas, and to improve their grammatical accuracy in oral and written production.

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Fourth Year French II

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

Fourth Year French II has been designed for students who have completed more than three years of French and although they may manage in daily tasks and interactions, they still need to improve their control over different oral and written registers. In addition, this course will offer them the opportunity to enhance the coherence and cohesion of their production, and to improve their grammatical accuracy.

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French Conversation

Fall (French; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

Compulsory three-credit course that complements the development of the linguistic skills facilitated in composition courses emphasizing the oral mode of the French language It aims to improve students' ability to maintain a sustained monologue as well as oral interactions.

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French Cuisine

Fall (200-level; 1 credit)

This course is designed to teach typical French recipes, as well as tips, serving ideas, and a bit of etiquette and customs. The lessons are arranged by meal, so that one can easily translate the lessons to real life cooking situations.

In addition to learning how to make appealing appetizers and entrees, students take several classes in baking and pastries. They learn tricks and tips that can be used in daily life. Students will spend time chopping onions, peeling potatoes, cutting meat, kneading dough and beating eggs, all of it under the supervision of the cooks who can teach them the tricks of the trade and correct any mistakes.

Generally, classes include one to two hours of explanations along with a practical hands-on component in the school (fully equipped and stocked kitchens where students cook).

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French Culture and Civilization: Getting to know Lyon Beyond the Walls

Fall (French; 200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (French; 200-level; 1 credit)

This short 15 hours course will introduce students to several aspects of French civilization discussed from a local perspective. It will cover different topics: education, politics, history, social organizations. The class will not take place in a regular classroom but will consist in visiting places, meeting people and exchanging ideas about their work and their involvement as members of French society. A short list of relevant vocabulary and basic knowledge about the subjects treated will be handed prior to or after the visits.

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French Stylistics

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

French Stylistics is an elective course for students of French as a second language at an advanced level, who have probably taken at least three years of college French. The goal of this course is to enhace the writing abilities, taking the written text as a contextualized communication event, addressed to an audience and with a clear and defined purpose. Therefore, class activities are centered around the analysis and the understanding of different written genres, so that they can be produced latter. In addition, this course does not neglect the oral interaction and expression, since the class is conducted entirely in French, reinforcing collaboration through group work.

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French Theater: Let's Play!

Spring (French, Theater; 200-level; 1 credit)

Description not available at this time.

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Government and Politics in France and Europe

Fall (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course aims at showing the specificities of French politics. It will present balance of power and go into detail about each power. It will also go into detail about elections and political parties so the students can understand the roots of today’s political debate. A review of some majors policies by the presidents of the 5th Republic will be also done in order to explain some evolution in the French society and illustrate the major difference between the everlasting gap between “gauche” and “droite”. Few minutes will be spent in the beginning of ach class to answer students’ questions.

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Intercultural Communication

Spring (Speech Communications; 400-level; 3 credits)

Globalization is a much talked about phenomenon which brings with it inevitable exchanges between cultures. How these exchanges are communicated and perceived largely depends on the person’s degree of cultural intelligence. A knowledge of foreign language(s) is only a part of that cultural intelligence.

Given the multicultural structure of the class, students will be able to immediately utilize the tools and reference points conveyed during the course in order to explore and verify other national cultures’ traits and characteristics.

Over the duration of this course students will be exposed to group project work, presentation skills to a multicultural audience, personal awareness and new situations which will test and improve their communications competency.

The success and enjoyment of the course will be based on the level of cultural exchange and learning which occurs both within the classroom and outside of it. In order to develop this learning experience, techniques such as coaching and storytelling may be utilized for the purpose of heightening the student’s level of awareness of their experiences, perceptions and behaviors and how these may be modified, allowing the student to better adapt to his / her new environment.

A new found self confidence can be achieved by knowing how to successfully deal with situations of conflict and by understanding how to influence others for the purpose of meeting one’s own personal and professional objectives in life.

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Marseille and the Mediterranean Sea Field Study

Fall (200-level; 1 credit)

Description not available at this time.

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Politics and Economics in the European Union

Spring (300-level; 3 credits)

This course examines the development and operation of the political and economic forces that have developed since the end of World War II in the form of the European Union. Currently, the E.U.´s political, economic and legal agreements affect not only its Member States but also the rest of the World. The course will examine the history of European integration, the relevant institutional and public policy issues, and the ongoing process of decision-making within the EU. Finally, it will focus on specific issues related to current economic problems facing the EU, and the challenges ahead.

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Provence and Avignon Field Study

Spring (200-level; 1 credit)

Description not available at this time.

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Second Year French I

Fall (French; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 200-level; 3 credits)

Second Year French I is a three-credit course offered to students who have completed a year of college French or its equivalent. In this course, the students will learn to narrate in the main time-frames, as well as to recognize the different uses of the subjunctive mood in the expression of different degrees of certainty, the expression of wishes and advice.

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Second Year French II

Fall (French; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 200-level; 3 credits)

Second Year French II is a course designed for students who have completed a year and a half of college French or its equivalent and want to learn how to use the language with increasing syntactic complexity and grammatical accuracy, paying special attention to the change of time-frames, as well as the expression of hypothesis and different degrees of certainty.

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Seminar in French Language

Fall (French; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 400-level; 3 credits)

Seminar is a course designed for students who have taken at least three years of French at college and want to improve the four skills in a balanced way: speaking, listening, writing and reading, as well as enhance their vocabulary and improve their grammatical accuracy.

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Survey of French Literature I

Fall (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Survey of French Literature II

Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

A study of the development of French literature through the analysis of literary movements and the comparison of the most important authors of each period. Texts from different literary genres are selected which demonstrate underlying ideas, the idiosyncrasies of the French people, and universal values, as well as the literary characteristics of the works themselves.

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The History of Arts

Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

Lyon’s rich heritage allows us to offer an introduction to the history of the arts. In order to sensitize students to Culture and Arts, we will both have practical workshops, lectures and visits of museums. Throughout our multiple interventions, we are trying to emphasize on the commonalities existing between arts. Indeed, it seems important that students understand the connections that exist between arts of all time, connections that got stronger in the 20th century. This course will be about the arts throughout its issues, its breakdowns but also its continuities.

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Third Year French I

Fall (French; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

This is a third year course for students who have completed two years of French at the college level or their equivalent. Emphasis is placed in improving the students´ writing abilities with the analysis first, and the subsequent production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics are reviewed in order to enhance and improve learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a novel or short stories will accompany and strengthen the formal instruction.

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Third Year French II

Fall (French; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (French; 300-level; 3 credits)

The focus of the course is improving the learners´ writing abilities with the analysis and the production of different types of texts. In addition, a number of grammatical topics will be reviewed in order to enhance and increase learners´ grammatical competence. The extensive reading of a novel or a collection of short stories will strengthen the formal instruction.

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Travel Photography

Spring (Art, Journalism; 200-level; 1 credit)

Regards sur la ville : une approche de la photographie pour découvrir un environnement urbain, se l’approprier et partager sa vision. Construire une mémoire commune à partir de regards individuels différents

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Travel Writing

Fall (English, Journalism, Speech Communications; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course introduces students to travel writing through critical encounters with travel literature classics, a survey of several popular forms of travel writing, and the research, writing, and sales of travel pieces of different lengths and forms. In addition to reading and writing travel pieces, students will develop pitch letters, generate story ideas, learn about research and ethics in the travel context, and workshop and revise their work.

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Understanding the French Bande Dessinée

Spring (400-level; 3 credits)

The history and artistry of the French bande dessinée and several related forms: the traditional comic, the graphic novel, sequential art, editorial/political drawings, etc. It will begin with extracts from Scott McCloud’s playful sequence art introduction, Understanding Comics, and turn to its themes are illustrated in classic French works (the relation of text to drawing, degrees of abstraction and iconicity, the representation of actions and time, etc.). We will focus on how BDs reflect cultural constructions of identity, and consider the explosion in the variety of forms and genres that have appeared since the 1980s. Themes will range from humor, to French national identity, the European and colonial contexts, political cartoons, and immigration, gender studies, war, crime stories, etc. Most readings in English; some will be in French. Class conducted in English.

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Quick Details

2017-18 App. Cycle

Fall and Yearlong: Late application may be possible. Contact USAC

Spring: Open

2018-19 App. Cycle

Application opens 9/1:

Summer (5 weeks)

Eligibility

Summer:

Minimum GPA: 2.5, one year of college-level French if studying French; no language prerequisite for Art History

Semester:

Minimum GPA: 2.5, one year of college-level French

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

U.S. Credit

Program Capacity

65

Instruction

English | French