Shanghai, China
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Shanghai, China | 2016 Fall

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You must enroll in at least 12 and up to 18 credits. While you may enroll in up to 18 credits, we recommend you enroll in 12-15 credits in order to have time to fully experience the local area's culture and people. Course availability may be subject to change for reasons beyond our control, such as student interest. All students not taking an intensive language track are required to take Elementary Chinese I, Intermediate Chinese I, Advanced Chinese I, or Chinese Conversation, as is appropriate for your level to help you assimilate more effectively into your living and learning environment.

Chinese Language Studies

USAC offers intensive language courses grouped into tracks as well elective language courses. The track courses are taught sequentially (back to back) within one semester. If you have already taken the first course in the track, you do not have to take it again for credit, but you must audit it. Language course sections are kept to a maximum enrollment of 15 students each. You may also select Chinese Studies and International Business courses for up to a total of 12-18 credits.

Track I (8 credits)—Prerequisite: none

Track II (6 credits)—Prerequisite: two semesters of college Chinese

Track III Option 1 (6 credits)—Prerequisite: four semesters of college Chinese

Track III Option 2 (6 credits)—TBD by placement exam on site

Chinese Studies and International Business

Taught in English
The following courses are designed to help familiarize you with the region. Note that all students not taking an intensive language track are required to at least take the first level of any language track, or the Chinese Conversation course, to help them assimilate into the community.

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.unr.edu

Chinese One-On-One Sessions

These one-on-one practice sessions are in addition to the Chinese language courses and take place outside of each language track course every week. You are strongly encouraged to participate. Materials and content covered in the sessions is customized to fit your immediate language needs in daily life. You are assigned 30 minutes to practice speaking with the instructor or graduate assistant during your session.

Field Studies

USAC helps you explore the historical, cultural, and natural features of the region with carefully planned tours. If taken for credit, added academic requirements (readings, research, written assignments, reports etc.) deepen your experience. This turns a tour into a Field Study which counts as part of your credit load. The optional Xi'an Field Study is a Field Study course.

Internships

USAC internships are rich resources for your academic and professional development particularly in your study abroad setting. USAC internships are considered courses and count as part of your credit load. They can be time-consuming, but are very worthwhile. Students are placed in an environment with high exposure to culture and language. Interns earn credits but no financial compensation. The schedule and the number of work hours will be determined by the schedule of USAC courses.

Internship opportunities include: internships in hotel management, architecture/design, teaching English as a second language, translation, event planning, marketing, medical/dental, and office support as program assistant in the USAC Shanghai office. Placement is not guaranteed by USAC, rather it will be determined by your application and supporting materials and an interview with the internship sponsor onsite.

Eligibility—enrollment in the Shanghai program, a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, junior standing at the time of the internship, and three semesters of college-level Chinese or fluent in Chinse. A refundable fee of $100 is charged and returned upon successful completion of the internship.

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professors are also teaching as Visiting Professors.

Spring Semester:

Dr. Hugh Shapiro | University of Nevada

Courses offered:

Dr. Shapiro (PhD, Harvard University) received his undergraduate degree from Stanford University and as a professor of history has enjoyed visiting appointments at Princeton, and in Japan, Taiwan, and China. His research has earned international prizes and he won his university's highest teaching award. He has lived in China regularly since 1978.

Course Descriptions

Advanced Chinese I

Fall (Chinese; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 300-level; 3 credits)

The objectives of the advanced Chinese language classes are to increase your knowledge of the language and to improve your ability to express yourself. This will be presented through practical material and permits you to have a better understanding of the use of the language. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Chinese.

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Advanced Chinese II

Fall (Chinese; 300-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 300-level; 3 credits)

The objectives of the advanced Chinese language classes are to increase your knowledge of the language and to improve your ability to express yourself. This will be presented through practical material and permits you to have a better understanding of the use of the language. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Prerequisite: five semesters of college Chinese.

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Advanced Chinese III

Fall (Chinese; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 400-level; 3 credits)

The objectives of the advanced Chinese language classes are to increase your knowledge of the language and to improve your ability to express yourself. This will be presented through practical material and permits you to have a better understanding of the use of the language. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Prerequisite: six semesters of college Chinese.

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Advanced Chinese IV

Fall (Chinese; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 400-level; 3 credits)

The objectives of the advanced Chinese language classes are to increase your knowledge of the language and to improve your ability to express yourself. This will be presented through practical material and permits you to have a better understanding of the use of the language. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Prerequisite: seven semesters of college Chinese.

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Ancient Chinese History

Fall (History; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course will be a survey of China’s history from the birth of civilization up to the modern era. We will examine the evolution and development of tradition, culture, philosophical thought, political organization, social structure, economic institutions, religious practice, and foreign relations in China. We will also compare social institutions and technological developments as they emerged in China and the West.

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Chinese Business Issues and Practices

Spring (International Business, Management; 300-level; 3 credits)

China's rise as a world economic power is changing the global political and economic landscape and it is profoundly affecting the competitive capabilities of multinational companies that put China as a business priority and intend to expand their resources commitment. To succeed in the Chinese market fused with multifaceted risks and to effectively integrate resources in a global perspective, however, foreign companies have to address and keep sight of many crucial issues and complexities concerning China's economic, political, legal, financial, socio-cultural and human resources arenas. In addition, business practitioners must have a set of China-specific consciousness, knowledge and skills, as well as sufficient flexibility, to meet different challenges in the process of market development and business operations.

The module is designed to provide opportunities to better understand China and enhance students’ capabilities for developing and managing China business ventures under the pressure of complexities and constant changes.

The module addresses the most critical strategy and operation issues foreign companies confront, which has immediate implications for their market access, financial status, human resources management and competition with Chinese players.

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Chinese Calligraphy

Fall (Art; 200-level; 2 credits)
Spring (Art; 200-level; 2 credits)

Chinese calligraphy, as one of the most glorious traditional arts in China, is the unique artistic form of Chinese characters. By using a writing brush, Chinese calligraphy expresses the writer’s learning and cultivation, thoughts and feelings, and character and ideology through the changing movements of dots and lines.

Chinese calligraphy has a long history of over 3000 years. It embodies the five thousand–year Chinese cultural accumulation and implies the strong flavor of Chinese nationality’s calligraphy reflects the connotation of the Chinese philosophy and incorporates the aesthetic properties of Chinese music, dancing and painting etc.

"If you don’t understand Chinese calligraphy, you would not have a thorough understanding of Chinese culture." In view of the above-mentioned characteristics of Chinese calligraphy, we offer this course. By introduction its development history, culture origins, style and skills, especially through plenty of practice, we aim at making international students have a deeper understanding of the basic sprits of traditional Chinese culture and receive the edifying influence of aesthetics.

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Chinese Conversation

Fall (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)

The objective of Chinese Conversation is to help beginning Chinese speakers function in a Chinese speaking society. Subjects and themes will be tailored to facilitate the needs of visiting students, and vocabulary study will reflect what students are likely to encounter in daily life. Complete understanding of the brief grammar section will be paramount to a student’s success. However, it will still primarily emphasize speaking and listening comprehension. Study of written Chinese will be limited to what will be necessary for students to engage themselves in daily life. Active participation in class is both encouraged and expected, and questions are welcome. Prerequisite: 2 semesters of college Chinese.

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Chinese Cuisine

Fall (200-level; 1 credit)
Spring (200-level; 1 credit)

Cuisine culture is a very important part of Chinese culture. We will introduce the history, main category of Chinese cuisine and emphasis on making the four mainstream ones: Shanghai, Sichuan, Cantonese and Huaiyang Cuisine. We will introduce the history, the development as well as their features.

As we all know that Chinese food is not only famous for wok dishes but also Dim Sums. For the rest of the lessons, we will arrange lessons for making Dim Sums.

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Contemporary Chinese Foreign Relations

Spring (Economics, Political Science; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course aims to introduce major features and issues of China’s foreign relations since gaige kaifang (opening-up and reform) in late 1970s. Focusing on the background and rationale of China’s foreign policy making, this course explores China’s foreign behavior in the context of globalization and power shifts of the world, so as to help students understand the trajectory and implications of China’s growing engagement in global affairs and, on this basis, develop their own insights into China’s future paths on the world stage. This course is research question-oriented rather than simply “learning from the instructor,” which means students must prepare themselves to ask and answer challenging questions concerning the one “theme question” addressed in each class.

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Corporate Finance

Fall (Finance; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course focuses on business and corporate finance, investments and international finance. Topics include business financial management. Taught in English.

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Elementary Chinese I

Fall (Chinese; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. Includes an introduction to Chinese culture.

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Elementary Chinese II

Fall (Chinese; 100-level; 4 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 100-level; 4 credits)

This course is a continuation of Elementary Chinese I. Focus is on the development of language skills through structural analysis as well as the continued practice of Chinese characters. The fundamentals of Chinese grammar, vocabulary and useful expressions are studied along with the emphasis on sentence structure of the Chinese language.

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Entrepreneurship in a Global Market

Fall (General Business; 400-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Environmental Impact of China's Modern Transformation

Spring (Environmental Science, Geography, History; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Environmental Science, Geography, History; 600-level; 3 credits)

Description not available at this time.

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Government and Politics in China

Fall (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course aims to facilitate students with some fundamental knowledge about Chinese political systems and policies by a general survey of the Chinese government structure, the government policies and ideologies that have served as, more or less, the practical basis of the political systems and policies at different stages.

When talking about China, many students may have questions in their minds, such as “Is China really an emerging superpower or is it a developing country?” “What are the challenges that China faces in its development?” “What are the prospects for democracy and civil society in China during the reform era?” “Why has China been able to achieve such significant economic growth in the last few decades?” “What are the costs to the environment and its citizens China has paid in its rapid economic development?” By taking a closer look at the Chinese polity, economy, and society, this course will lead students to find answers to those questions.

The class will be conducted in an approach of “research based” or “question based”. Students are encouraged to be involved in discussing the topics provided by the course and their answers will be presented in the form of in-class presentation.

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Intermediate Chinese I

Fall (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course is designed to further develop the students’ listening comprehension, speaking skills, reading and writing proficiency in Chinese. New grammar points will be introduced and selected grammar points are reviewed during class sessions. Various activities - discussions, oral presentations, conversions - will provide the opportunity to practice on speaking and listening, class participation is therefore essential.

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Intermediate Chinese II

Fall (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Chinese I and is designed to further develop the students’ listening comprehension, speaking skills, reading and writing proficiency in Chinese. New grammar points will be introduced and selected grammar points are reviewed during class sessions. Various activities - discussions, oral presentations, conversions - will provide the opportunity to practice on speaking and listening, class participation is therefore essential.

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International Business Management

Fall (International Business, Management; 400-level; 3 credits)

It is aimed at providing the students with the knowledge of different environments of doing business around the world, and relevant skills in the managing of the business in multinational corporations.

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International Financial Management

Spring (Finance, International Business; 300-level; 3 credits)

This course focuses on the study of the international business environment faced by the companies which do business with other overseas entities as well as residents in an open economy. The course is designed as an introduction to the theory and application of international monetary and financial economics. The material covered will include international financial activities, international reserves, and international monetary system.

The course will also discuss the 'major' equilibrium relationships or parity conditions that form the basis of theories of exchange rate determination, hedging foreign exchange risk which allows a greater understanding of the risks and opportunities faced by Firms or individuals

Other topics that will be touched upon include international bond and equity markets and international banking system.

Since the world of international finance is ever-changing with exciting events impacting the topics on a daily basis. It should be noted that the course is may involve current events. So the course will be probably talked by discussing some issues appearing in periodicals, such as The Wall Street Journal or Chinese Magazines.

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International Marketing

Spring (International Business, Marketing; 400-level; 3 credits)

The module is designed to enable students to develop marketing strategies and plans in and across a range of different international market environments. As well as extending students' marketing and strategic skills obtained in earlier modules into a global context, it develops knowledge and skills in international marketing processes.

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Managing in a Global Economy with Emphasis on China

Spring (International Business, Management; 300-level; 3 credits)

The world economy is in the state of fast growing and apparent disproportionate. Many people label the current economic situation as ‘stable disequilibrium’. The world economy is driven by the slow but still strong economic growth of the developed countries on one hand and the fast catching-up development of the developing countries. The new advancements of information technology make the result of this economic competition uncertain. Taught in English.

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Marketing Principles

Fall (Marketing; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course focuses on objectives and policies of marketing managers as influenced by marketing institutions, the functions performed and consumer wants and needs in a diverse culture.

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Modern Chinese Culture and Society

Spring (Anthropology, Chinese, Sociology; 200-level; 3 credits)

The course is to illustrate cultural and social mainstream of contemporary China, to familiarize students with the underlying values and practices that shape modern Chinese, with presentations, film clips and analysis on various historic events, legends, traditions, ancient philosophies, religions and social norms in a sociological and economic perspective.

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Seminar in Mandarin Chinese: Preparation for the HSK Exam

Fall (Chinese; 400-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Chinese; 400-level; 1 credit)

The class will mainly focus on helping the test takers get familiar with the mode and questions of the HSK test, understanding its contents and focuses, such as the grammar patterns and vocabulary, as well as master the test taking strategies. Organized in-class activities include listening to record, memorizing the vocabulary of Chinese Proficiency Test Syllabus Level 4,

dictation, grasping the grammar patterns and completing examination papers.

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Shifting Topography of Health Care in Urban China: Business, Medical, Political, and Cultural Perspectives

Spring (Environmental Science, Geography, History; 400-level; 3 credits)
Spring (Community Health Sciences, History, Sociology; 600-level; 3 credits)

Of the roiling transformations witnessed in China since Deng’s reforms, medicine is among the most dynamic. This course grapples with the complex terrain of health care--its policy and practice--in contemporary urban China. Examples of themes to be analyzed: profitization and chronic over-crowding of hospitals; violence against doctors; rise of psychotherapy, as a new booming industry and an emerging professional niche; the big business of big pharmaceuticals and the influence of drug economics on the diagnosis and treatment of disease; the for-profit fertility industry (reproductive endocrinology, gestational surrogates). In addition to lectures and discussion in class, we will visit hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, and clinics.

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Tai Chi

Fall (Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)
Spring (Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)

Taiji is a Chinese “Kongfu” which contains inside and outside exercise, it broad and rich contains makes Taiji the symbol of Chinese culture. Taiji makes “Yin and Yang” as it sole, and two of the most important scholar: Zhang Sanfeng an Wang Zongyue’s theory as it basic theory. At the recent half century, through the research, it is proved that Taiji has very good function of defend all kind of disease as well as a very good \physical exercise. It has been listed as one of the credit course of the schools by the Education Administration. It is also listed in Asian Games. According to the “World Week” report: Taiji is the best and cheapest way to keep people’s health especially for older peoples. Japanese women call this: a good way of keeping people’s health and weight loss. We can say Taiji is the art with all kinds of functions.

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Xi'an Field Study

Fall (Chinese; 200-level; 1 credit)

This course is designed to offer all students a better understanding on ancient Chinese history and culture through a 4 day field trip in China’s ancient capital, Xi’an. With its humanistic heritage and archeological excavations, Xi’an is renowned for its status in Chinese culture and history, which will be specially emphasized by focusing on the major anthropological, archeological and religious aspects in that city. This field trip enables students to obtain one credit in Ancient Chinese History and Culture. This is also an excellent opportunity to break the routine of classes and get acquainted with other parts of the country.

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Quick Details

2017-18 App. Cycle

Summer I (5 weeks): Closed

Summer I & II (9 weeks): Closed

Summer II (4 weeks) Open

Fall or Yearlong: Open

Spring: Open

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

U.S. Credit

Program Capacity

50

Instruction

English