Chengdu, China
USAC
1-866-404-USAC1-775-784-65691-775-784-6010studyabroad@usac.unr.edu

Course Information

Chengdu, China | 2017 Summer Session II

Studying abroad can be a more meaningful and invigorating learning experience than at home—both inside and outside of the classroom. You may be more curious and alert than you usually are so use this heightened energy to enhance your studies as well as your cultural and geographical explorations. You may also encounter different teaching styles and course processes; be prepared to adapt and to learn.

Courses

You will enroll in three to six credits in Session I and in three to five credits in Session II. At least one 3-credit course is required in each summer session. Course availability is contingent upon student interest and enrollment and is subject to change.

Chinese Language Studies

Summer language courses are intensive, with one to four credits of Chinese taught in each session. Language courses have a maximum enrollment of 12 students each. Higher levels are available for advanced level speakers.

Session I and Session II

Chinese Culture Studies and International Relations

Taught in English
The following courses are designed to familiarize you with the region and provide a multi-disciplinary perspective to your studies.

Session I

Session II

To request a course syllabus: syllabus@usac.unr.edu

Field Studies

Deepen your academic experience through the Minority Culture Field Study, which helps you explore the historical,cultural, and natural features of the region. Students who enroll in this 3-credit course will select a particular topic of interest to examine as part of the Field Study, and complete a research paper drawing from their field study experience as well as from additional readings, research, and written assignments. Given the dates of the Minority Culture Field Study you may only enroll in one additional 3-credit Chinese language course or a 1-credit introductory language or elective course.

US Professors

Local faculty teach most USAC courses; however, the following US professors are also teaching as Visiting Professors.

Session I:

Dr. Robert Gioielli | University of Cincinnati

Course offered:

Robert Gioielli’s own study-abroad program to Great Britain 20 years ago forever shaped his life and career, and since then he has lived and traveled extensively in Europe, Asia, and North America. He is an environmental historian, with a particular interest in environmental activism and reform movements in both the United States and around the world and how the relationship between humans and the natural world shapes global history. This will be his second time in Chengdu with USAC, and he is excited to continue exploring this amazing city and country.

Session II:

Dr. Litong Chen | University of Mount Union

Course offered:

Dr. Litong Chen is a native of Chongqing, China. He is Assistant Professor at the University of Mount Union. Dr. Chen received his Ph.D. in Chinese Linguistics from The Ohio State University. His main research interest is in Chinese dialectology, especially contact phenomena among languages/dialects in southern China. He has made numerous conference presentations and is the author of several journal articles in the areas of Chinese dialectology and translation.

Course Descriptions

Advanced Chinese I

Summer Session I (Chinese; 300-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Chinese; 300-level; 3 credits)

The objectives of the advanced Chinese language classes are to increase your knowledge of the language and to improve your ability to express yourself. This will be presented through practical material and permits you to have a better understanding of the use of the language. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Prerequisite: four semesters of college Chinese.

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Advanced Chinese II

Summer Session I (Chinese; 300-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Chinese; 300-level; 3 credits)

The objectives of the advanced Chinese language classes are to increase your knowledge of the language and to improve your ability to express yourself. This will be presented through practical material and permits you to have a better understanding of the use of the language. Conversation, reading, and writing focus on culture and modern literature. Prerequisite: five semesters of college Chinese.

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Chinese Economy

Summer Session I (Economics; 400-level; 3 credits)

Gain a better understanding of the People’s Republic of China and its economy. The objective of this course is to help students trace the major economic historical events since 1949, understand the process of reform from a planned to a market economy since 1978. With this information, students will be able to evaluate the arguments concerning further necessary economic reforms (including the concept of market socialism). (Session I).

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Summer Session II (Anthropology; 200-level; 3 credits)

This course is an introduction of Chinese culture through the lens of popular culture. From film to literature, from music to theatre, from popular TV shows to social media, from western/Japanese/Korean impact to the impact of celebrity/fensi, this course explores popular culture’s relations to social change, technology development, public spaces, the state, national identity, and globalization.

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Elementary Chinese I

Summer Session I (Chinese; 100-level; 4 credits)
Summer Session II (Chinese; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills.

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Elementary Chinese II

Summer Session I (Chinese; 100-level; 4 credits)
Summer Session II (Chinese; 100-level; 4 credits)

Introduction to the language through the development of language skills and through structural analysis. The fundamentals of grammar (all verb tenses), vocabulary, and useful expressions are studied. The objective of these courses is to build reading, writing, listening, and above all, speaking skills. Prerequisite: one semester of college Chinese.

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Global Environmental History

Summer Session I (History, Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)

This course explores the history of the world since 1500 by putting human/nature relations at the center of the story. The class will begin with an examination of different theories concerning world history, and then study the key themes and topics in environmental history (agriculture, forestry, energy) from a global perspective, but also major themes in world history from an environmental perspective (industrialization, colonialism, war). The course will finish with an examination of contemporary international debates over resource use, development and climate change, and consider the possible solutions to those disputes. This course will also take advantage of the environmental history of Chengdu and Sichuan region, with excursions planned for the Chengdu Panda Breeding Center and Dujiangyan Irrigation System.

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Government and Politics in China

Summer Session I (Political Science; 400-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session I (Political Science; 600-level; 3 credits)

An examination of the governmental institutions, policies, and political evolution of China. The objective of the course is to gain insight into the problems, ideologies, political and economic realities of China today.

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Intermediate Chinese I

Summer Session I (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)

These courses emphasize the sentence structure of the Chinese language. Classes are divided into three parts: grammar, reading and writing. The objective of these courses is to further develop Chinese language skills, both oral and written. Particular emphasis on oral skills. Prerequisite: two semesters of college Chinese.

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Intermediate Chinese II

Summer Session I (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)
Summer Session II (Chinese; 200-level; 3 credits)

These courses emphasize the sentence structure of the Chinese language. Classes are divided into three parts: grammar, reading and writing. The objective of these courses is to further develop Chinese language skills, both oral and written. Particular emphasis on oral skills. Prerequisite: three semesters of college Chinese.

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Introduction to Chinese Language I

Summer Session I (100-level; 1 credit)
Summer Session II (100-level; 1 credit)

The objective of this course is to help beginning Chinese speakers function in a Chinese speaking society. Subject and themes will be tailored to facilitate the needs of visiting students, and vocabulary study reflects what students are likely to encounter in daily life. Complete understanding of the brief grammar section will be a paramount to s student’s success. However, it will still primarily emphasize speaking and listening comprehension. Study of written Chinese will be limited to what will be necessary for students to engage themselves in daily life. Active participation on class is both encouraged and expected, and questions are welcome.

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Minority Culture Field Study

Summer Session I (400-level; 3 credits)

Most are located in Northwest, Northeast and Southwest areas. This course will focus on Miao, Dong and Buyi minorities. A brief introduction of the history will be given but will focus on the cultural, social and economical aspect, especially the area changed from traditional agriculture to tourism economy and how the diversity economical transformation happens based on individual social structure. At the same time, we will learn about special architect, ethnic singing and dancing.

The course is divided into two parts: class room lectures and the ten day field study. The field study is designed to optimize the benefits of the lectures by providing a solid multi-culture base for studies of Chinese ethnic groups’ societies, economy and cultures

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Modern Chinese Culture and Society

Summer Session II (Anthropology, Chinese, Sociology; 200-level; 3 credits)

The course aims at providing a compendium of the contemporary Chinese culture and society by means of a descriptive and analytic survey of chosen topics. While focusing on the cultural and social mainstream of contemporary China, the course also presents and analyzes various historic events, legends, traditions, ancient philosophies, religions and social norms in a sociological and economic perspective so as to enable students to have a better understanding of the evolution of and interactions between the Chinese culture and society.

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Modern Chinese History

Summer Session II (400-level; 3 credits)

For a country such as China that has so long a history more than 5,000 years, it is absolutely necessary to set up a course specializing in its modern ages as well as contemporary problems. The Modern Chinese History course just focuses on the very field. Generally speaking, scholars in China consider the first opium war broke out in 1840 as the beginning of modern China. From then on, China suffered great turmoil and also experienced huge changes in every field, which were strongly affected by western world. The interrelationship between China and the west has special significance for this course. This course will chronologically introduce every stage in modern Chinese history, and pay more attention on some influential events, figures and political parties. This course intends to provide students an overall view of modern Chinese history, and particularly its half-being forced modernization and westernization. In addition, it assists students to look into problems of modern Chinese history in depth. By discussing those important problems in modern Chinese history, this course encourages students to debate the causes and effects, and even make some rational assumptions for the possibilities in Chinese history. Consequently, this course wants to provide students a way of critical thinking on the problems of modern China, and finally gain a better understanding on China’s position in the modern world.

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Sichuan Cuisine

Summer Session I (Nutrition; 200-level; 1 credit)

In this course, we will introduce the history, development and the main category of Chinese cuisine, emphasizing on Sichuan Cuisine. Other than the classroom lecture, the course will focus on how to cook in a traditional way.

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Tai Chi

Summer Session II (Recreation / Physical Education; 100-level; 1 credit)

As part of the program, you will have the opportunity to practice Tai Chi two hours each week. Tai Chi is the traditional Chinese martial art which is used by many Chinese today to stay physically fit, and which provides insights on the culture and philosophy of the Chinese.

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Quick Details

2017-18 App. Cycle

Fall: Open

Yearlong: Open

Spring: Open

2018-19 App. Cycle

Application opens 9/1:

Summer I (5 weeks)

Summer II (4 weeks)

Summer I & II (9 weeks)

Eligibility

Minimum GPA: 2.5

Program Type

Specialty

Credits

U.S. Credit

Program Capacity

50

Instruction

English